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  • 5-May-2021

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Review of Shenzhen, China - A Journey of Continuous Learning

    Shenzhen is a stellar case of growth and economic transformation. Since its establishment as one of China’s first four Special Economic Zones in 1980, it has evolved at breakneck speed. Shenzhen transformed from a fishing village to a major world trade hub and is now home to global innovators in electronics. The Production Transformation Policy Review (PTPR) of Shenzhen, China reviews the city’s changing policy approaches, focusing on the shift from an assembly to a manufacturing centre and more recently to an innovation and start-up hub. Through a comprehensive assessment of Shenzhen’s experience, this review offers insights into the range of policies and strategies employed to stimulate industrial upgrading and learning in China. It provides lessons and actionable policy recommendations for the growth of cities and emerging economies in their catching-up journey. The PTPR of Shenzhen, China has been carried out in the framework of the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development and has benefitted from government-business dialogues and international peer learning (University of Seoul, Korea; University of Georgetown, USA and Digital India Foundation, India).
  • 6-April-2021

    English

    DevTalks: Providing debt relief and financing a sustainable recovery in Africa

    This DevTalk, co-organised by the OECD Development Centre and the T20 Co-Chair International Affairs Institute, will be an opportunity to weigh up solutions for debt management in Africa, engaging experts in a debate on how the G20 can better support efforts to address African governments’ liquidity and financing needs.

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  • 1-April-2021

    English

    Platform on investment and productive transformation in Africa

    Even before the COVID-19 crisis stopped the continent’s economic growth in its tracks, Africa was facing a deficit in domestic and foreign productive investment. Levels were too low to either match the needs of a fast growing, increasingly urban, working-age population, or improve the insertion of the continent in the global economy.

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  • 30-March-2021

    English

    Southeast Asia: discriminatory social institutions continue to hinder women’s empowerment, says new report

    Discrimination in informal and formal laws, social norms and practices against women and girls remain high in Southeast Asia compared with the rest of the world. As COVID-19 disproportionally affects women and girls, the pandemic may slow down the region’s progress towards gender equality and women’s empowerment, according to the Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) 2021 Regional Report for Southeast Asia.

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  • 30-March-2021

    English

    SIGI 2021 Regional Report for Southeast Asia

    Achieving gender equality and tackling discriminatory laws, social norms and practices set a direct path toward a more inclusive economy and society. The SIGI 2021 Regional Report for Southeast Asia provides new evidence-based analysis on the setbacks and progress in achieving gender equality between 2014 and 2019 in 11 countries. The report uncovers the discrimination women face within social institutions in various dimensions; in the family and household context, in relation to physical integrity and access to productive and financial resources, as well within the political and civil spheres. The SIGI 2021 Regional Report for Southeast Asia explores the interaction between women’s empowerment and discriminatory social institutions by looking specifically at four core areas – health, education, the economic dimension and decision making. It also unveils the cost of discriminatory social institutions for Southeast Asian countries and the socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis for women and girls. Building on the regional analysis of how discriminatory social institutions continue to hinder efforts toward SDG 5, the report provides a set of policy recommendations to enhance governments’ efforts to deliver on their gender equality commitments by 2030.
  • 26-March-2021

    English

    Green DevTalks for Africa’s green future

    The first Green DevTalk will delve into the domestic and multilateral policy measures and partnerships needed to accelerate technology transfer to African countries, while the second will discuss the role of cities in accelerating both the ecological transition in Africa.

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  • 26-March-2021

    English

    Youth aspirations and the reality of jobs in Africa

    The gap between youth aspirations and the reality of the labour markets in Africa is large. Career aspirations of young Africans have little in common with current and projected labour demand in the region, making it unlikely that they will go through a smooth school to work transition. Evidence from ten African countries shows that what youth in these countries value most is job security, such as work in the public sector. Agriculture-related work or medium-skilled jobs in manufacturing are the least attractive for young Africans. Policies can help address the misalignment between youth employment preferences and employment opportunities. A two-pronged approach is recommended: i) helping young people shape career aspirations that are realistic and that can fit with the world they will be entering, and ii) improving the quality of jobs with due regard to the job conditions that matter for young people.
  • 25-March-2021

    English

    DevTalks - Reviving international co-operation

    DEV Talks, a series of online panel discussions form a dedicated space to discuss and draw up the blueprints for a ‌new deal for development: from renegotiating social contracts to overhauling international relations, fighting climate change and resilient societies.

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  • 25-March-2021

    English

    How Was Life? Volume II - New Perspectives on Well-being and Global Inequality since 1820

    How was life in 1820, and how has it changed since then? This question, which was at the core of How Was Life? Global Well-being since 1820, published by the OECD in 2014, is addressed by this second volume based on a broader perspective. How Was Life? New Perspectives on Well-being and Global Inequality since 1820, presents new estimates of working hours, biodiversity loss, social spending and GDP (accounting for the 2011 round on purchasing power parities) as well as measures of inequalities in wealth, longevity and educational attainment, gender disparities and extreme poverty. A final chapter synthesises the historical evidence included both in the current and previous volume of How Was Life? through composite measures of the average well-being performance of each country, and of different within-country inequality measures. As was the case for the previous volume, this book combines both a historical and a global perspective, presenting estimates since 1820 for 25 major countries and 8 world regions. While this evidence sometimes relies on partial and limited evidence, each chapter in this book assesses the quality of the data used and identifies areas for further historical research. This second volume of How Was Life? is the product of collaboration between the OECD and the OECD Development Centre, on one side, and a group of economic historians gathered around the CLIO-INFRA and Maddison projects, on the other. The historical evidence included in the report is organised around dimensions of well-being that mirror those used by the OECD in its report How’s Life?
  • 19-March-2021

    English

    DevTalks - Quality for equality: Making quality infrastructures work for gender equality

    This DevTalk will address pressing questions such as: how can we accelerate gender mainstreaming in infrastructure development? How can gender considerations be effectively integrated across all phases of infrastructure development? And how to ensure women’s participation in the decision-making process?

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