By Date


  • 5-November-2018

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Korea 2015

    Skills are central to Korea’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Korea identifies 12 skills challenges that need to be addressed to build a more effective skills system in Korea. These challenges were identified through: 1) the OECD’s recent data and research; 2) the national data and research; 3) a diagnostic workshop 4) fact-finding interviews with key stakeholders in Korea. The report has also benefited from ongoing dialogue and consultation with a wide range of Korean stakeholders. The first nine challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The next three challenges refer to the 'enabling' conditions that strengthen the overall skills system. Success in tackling these skills challenges will boost performance across the whole skills system. All of the challenges identified are strongly interlinked, and their connections with each other are identified throughout the report. Failure to look beyond policy silos will have implications for specific groups in Korea, such as youth, as well as for the economy and society’s ability to recover following the economic crisis and build a solid foundation for future prosperity.
  • 4-July-2018

    English

    Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education in The Netherlands

    The higher education sector in The Netherlands offers excellent examples of what it means to be innovative and entrepreneurial, and promote entrepreneurial mind sets, entrepreneurship and knowledge exchange. Creating value from academic knowledge through innovative services, products, processes and business models that meet economic, social and environmental needs lies at the core of this strategy. The current challenge is to strenghten the anchoring of value-creation processes in education and research. This can be achieved through increased interdisciplinarity, entrepreneurial mindset development across all subject areas, incentives for effective wider world engagement of researchers and students, and growth-oriented support for startups. This report presents an in-depth analysis of the policy framework and institutional practices and provides useful guidance for policy makers and university leaders across the world. HEInnovate is a joint initiative of the European Commission and the OECD to promote the innovative and entrepreneurial higher education institution.
  • 11-June-2018

    English

    Effective Teacher Policies - Insights from PISA

    Teachers are the most important resource in today’s schools. In every country, teachers’ salaries and training represent the greatest share of expenditure in education. And this investment in teachers can have significant returns: research shows that being taught by the best teachers can make a real difference in the learning and life outcomes of otherwise similar students. Teachers, in other words, are not interchangeable workers in some sort of industrial assembly line; individual teachers can change lives – and better teachers are crucial to improving the education that schools provide. Improving the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of schooling depends, in large measure, on ensuring that competent people want to work as teachers, that their teaching is of high quality and that high-quality teaching is provided to all students. This report, building on data from the Indicators of Education Systems (INES) programme, the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), explores three teacher-policy questions: How do the best-performing countries select, develop, evaluate and compensate teachers? How does teacher sorting across schools affect the equity of education systems? And how can countries attract and retain talented men and women to teaching?
  • 11-June-2018

    English

    Education Policy Outlook 2018 - Putting Student Learning at the Centre

    Taking the students’ perspective, Education Policy Outlook 2018: Putting Student Learning at the Centre analyses the evolution of key education priorities and key education policies in 43 education systems. It compares more recent developments in education policy ecosystems (mainly between 2015 and 2017) with various education policies adopted between 2008 and 2014. This report includes around 200 policies spanning from early childhood education and care (ECEC) to higher education and lifelong learning on topics such as: improving the quality and access to ECEC, promoting education success for all students, reducing the negative impact of some system-level policies and practices, increasing completion of upper secondary education, developing quality vocational education and training, enhancing the quality of tertiary education, supporting transitions across education pathways and the labour market.
  • 29-May-2018

    English

    World Class - How to Build a 21st-Century School System

    In a world where the kind of things that are easy to teach and test have also become easy to digitise and automate, it will be our imagination, our awareness and our sense of responsibility that will enable us to harness the opportunities of the 21st century to shape the world for the better. Tomorrow’s schools will need to help students think for themselves and join others, with empathy, in work and citizenship. They will need to help students develop a strong sense of right and wrong, and sensitivity to the claims that others make.What will it take for schools to be able to do this? Andreas Schleicher, initiator of the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and an international authority on education policy, has accompanied education leaders in over 70 countries in their efforts to design and implement forward-looking policies and practices. While improvement in education is far easier to proclaim than achieve, in this book Schleicher examines the many successes from which we can learn. This does not mean copying and pasting solutions from other schools or countries, but rather looking seriously and dispassionately at good practice in our own countries and elsewhere to understand what works in which contexts. Trained in physics, Schleicher offers a unique perspective on education reform: he convincingly argues that it should not necessarily be less of an art, but more of a science.'No one knows more about education around the world than Andreas Schleicher. Full stop. For the first time, he's collected 20 years worth of wisdom in one place. World Class should be required reading for policy makers, education leaders and anyone who wants to know how our schools can adapt for the modern world – and help all kids learn to think for themselves.'Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World, a New York Times bestseller'[Schleicher]…grasps all the key issues, and does so through keeping his ear to the ground and by working out solutions jointly with a variety of leaders at all levels of the system, and in diverse societies'Michael Fullan, Global Leadership Director, New Pedagogies for Deep Learning'Every visionary leader who is serious about improving student learning should add the data-driven World Class: How to Build a 21st-Century School System to the top of his or her reading list.'Jeb Bush, 43rd Governor of Florida, and Founder and Chairman of the Foundation for Excellence in Education'…a must-read for those who wish to create a future in which economic opportunity can be shared by all.'Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum'In this timely and forward-looking book, one of the most knowledgeable educators in the world draws on impressive data, keen observations, and considerable wisdom to indicate the paths to effective education for all young people.'Howard Gardner, Senior Director of Harvard Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • 28-May-2018

    English

    Catching Up? Country Studies on Intergenerational Mobility and Children of Immigrants

    Previous OECD and EU work has shown that even native-born children with immigrant parents face persistent disadvantage in the education system, the school-to-work transition and the labour market. To which degree are these linked with their immigration background, i.e. with the issues faced by their parents? Complementing the report Catching Up? Intergenerational Mobility and Children of Immigrants (OECD 2017), this publication presents seven in-depth country case studies. The countries and regions covered in this publication are Austria, the European Union, France, Germany, the Netherlands, North America and Sweden.
  • 4-May-2018

    English

    Skills Strategy Implementation Guidance for Portugal - Strengthening the Adult-Learning System

    Raising skills is critical to Portugal’s economic success and social well-being. As globalisation and digitalisation are transforming how people work, how societies function and how individuals interact, Portugal needs to equip its entire population with strong skills so that they can benefit from new opportunities.Portugal has put education and skills at the forefront of the political agenda for many years, but more than half of adults have not completed upper secondary education. With the population ageing rapidly and a growing skills divide between generations, Portugal needs to further strengthen its adult-learning system. To make change happen, Portugal will need a clear vision for the adult-learning system and a strong partnership between all stakeholders – all levels of government, education and training providers, employers, trade unions, the non-profit sector and learners.This report outlines areas where the accessibility, flexibility and quality of the adult-learning system can be improved, where governance and financing mechanisms can be strengthened, and provides examples of international and national good practice to help achieve these objectives. The report provides a series of concrete actions to help Portugal improve the adult-learning system and in turn enhance economic growth and social cohesion.
  • 26-April-2018

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Spain

    This report identifies effective strategies to tackle skills imbalances in Spain. It provides an assessment of practices and policies in the following areas: the collection and use of information on skill needs to foster a better alignment between skills acquisition and labour market needs; education and training policies targeting skills development and investment for individuals and employers; activation policies to develop skills through on-the-job learning; and policies facilitating the entry of migrants with skills that are in demand. The assessment is based on country visits, desk research and data analysis conducted by the OECD secretariat.
  • 19-April-2018

    English

    Greece can turn its education system into a source of inclusive and sustainable growth

    With a qualified and well-engaged teacher workforce, motivated 15-year-old students with a strong sense of school belonging, and one of the lowest dropout rates across the European Union, Greece is well placed to build a strong and inclusive education system.

    Related Documents
  • 19-April-2018

    English

    Education for a Bright Future in Greece

    After a decade of severe fiscal crisis also impacting education, Greece is looking ahead. Now is the time to invest effectively in education and define a forward-looking path for Greece. Building on the current reform agenda, this report offers an analysis of the context and underlying policy issues that once addressed, can contribute to raising the quality and equity of education in Greece.Drawing on evidence and international experience, the review highlights policy options that can guide and enhance current reform efforts in Greece in four areas: effective governance; policies for school improvement; efficiency, equity and quality of the education system; tertiary education. How can the governance and financing of Greek education be streamlined and improved? How can Greece achieve greater equity in educational provision and student outcomes? How can the Greek - qualified and well engaged - teaching force help promote school improvement? Last but not least, how can higher education help Greece restore prosperity?This report takes a hard look at the above issues, and many others. It will offer precious insights to policy makers and the education community.
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