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  • 13-October-2021

    English

    Tax and Fiscal Policies after the COVID-19 Crisis: OECD Report for G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors, October 2021, Italy

    This report has been prepared for G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors at the request of the Italian G20 Presidency to provide a first look at how tax policies can support inclusive and sustainable growth beyond the COVID-19 crisis.

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  • 13-October-2021

    English

    Tax Policy and Climate Change: IMF/OECD Report for the G20

    This report focuses on carbon pricing, taking stock of current pricing patterns, identifying reform needs to meet mitigation pledges, impacts, and opportunities, and comprehensive approaches to address political economy concerns.

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  • 29-July-2021

    English

    Corporate effective tax rates for R&D - The case of expenditure-based R&D tax incentives

    R&D tax incentives have become a widely used policy tool to promote business R&D. How do they shape firms’ incentives to invest in R&D? This paper contributes a methodology to construct forward-looking effective tax rates for an R&D investment that reflect the value of expenditure-based R&D tax incentives. The new OECD estimates cover 48 countries and consider the case of large profitable firms, accounting for the bulk of R&D in most economies. The results provide new insights into the generosity of R&D tax incentives from the perspective of firms that decide on whether or where to invest in R&D (extensive margin) and the level (intensive margin) of R&D investment. The generosity of the favourable tax treatment of R&D is shown to vary at the intensive and extensive margins, highlighting differences in countries’ strategies to support R&D through the tax system.
  • 16-July-2021

    English

    Reforming the taxation of housing in Israel

    This paper examines the taxation of housing in Israel, and proposes a set of reforms to improve the efficiency and fairness of the current system. Israel’s housing tax system faces similar problems to those of many other OECD countries. In particular, a bias arises in favour of owner-occupied property relative to rented property due to the non-taxation of imputed rents and most capital gains. That said, unlike many OECD countries, Israel taxes some owner-occupied capital gains (above a generous threshold) and generally does not allow mortgage interest relief for owner-occupied properties, reducing the extent of the distortion more than in many countries. As with most OECD countries, Israel levies highly distortionary transaction taxes, although a zero-rate band significantly limits the number of owner-occupied house purchases subject to the tax. Additionally, Israel’s recurrent property tax (the Arnona) faces a number of design problems, while the tax rules for rental income are complex and subject to significant tax evasion. To address these concerns, a reform package is proposed that involves a gradual and broadly revenue-neutral shift away from transaction taxes towards recurrent taxation of residential property, via increases in both the recurrent property tax and rental income taxation. The redesign of the recurrent property tax from an area-based to a market value-based tax is also proposed, as are a number of more technical reforms.
  • 11-May-2021

    English

    Inheritance Taxation in OECD Countries

    The report explores the role that inheritance taxation could play in raising revenues, addressing inequalities and improving efficiency in OECD countries. It provides background on the distribution and evolution of household wealth and inheritances, assesses the case for and against inheritance taxation drawing on existing theoretical and empirical literature, and examines the design of inheritance, estate and gift taxes in OECD countries. The report concludes with a number of reform options that governments could consider to improve the design and functioning of wealth transfer taxes.
  • 5-May-2021

    English

    Effective Carbon Rates 2021 - Pricing Carbon Emissions through Taxes and Emissions Trading

    Carbon pricing very effectively encourages the shift of production and consumption choices towards low and zero carbon options that is required to limit climate change. Are countries using this tool to its full potential? This report measures the pricing of CO2-emissions from energy use in 44 OECD and G20 countries, covering around 80% of world emissions. The analysis takes a comprehensive view of carbon prices, including fuel excise taxes, carbon taxes and tradable emission permit prices. The 'carbon pricing score' measures how close the 44 countries, together as well as individually, are to the goal of pricing all energy related carbon emissions at current and forward-looking benchmark values for carbon costs. The report highlights the structure of effective carbon rates across countries and sectors in 2018 and discusses change compared to 2012 and 2015. It also provides an outlook on recent trends in emissions trading in China and the European Union.
  • 30-April-2021

    English, PDF, 4,698kb

    Brochure - OECD work on taxation

    This brochure highlights the key areas of work of the OECD’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the various groups that it serves.

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  • 22-April-2021

    English, Excel, 286kb

    Database: Country tax measures during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Latest data on tax measures taken by governments so far in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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  • 30-March-2021

    English

    OECD releases main data from Effective Carbon Rates 2021

    A preview released today of the OECD’s Effective Carbon Rates 2021 report looks at the excise taxes, carbon taxes and emissions permit prices that effectively result in a carbon price in the 44 OECD and G20 countries, which account for 80% of global carbon emissions from energy.

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  • 17-February-2021

    English

    Blog post: Why should developing countries implement carbon pricing when even advanced economies fall woefully short?

    Jonas Teusch and Konstantinos Theodoropoulos (OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration) explore the issue in their joint Development Matters blog post on taxing energy use for sustainable development.

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