Share

Latest Documents


  • 29-January-2018

    English

    Making Blended Finance Work for the Sustainable Development Goals

    The global community has spoken loud and clear: more resources must be mobilised to end extreme poverty and mitigate the effects of climate change. Blended finance - an approach to mix different forms of capital in support of development - is emerging as an important solution to help raise resources for the Sustainable Development Goals in developing countries. But scaling up blended finance without a good understanding of its risks could have unintended consequences for development co-operation providers. This report presents a comprehensive assessment of the state and priorities for blended finance as it is being used to support sustainable development in developing countries. It describes concepts and definitions, presents an overview of actors and instruments, and discusses lessons learned from blending approaches, tracking and data, and monitoring and evaluation. Its findings and recommendations are useful for policy makers and practitioners. 'Blended finance will contribute to faster economic growth, but to achieve this it is vital to get donors into alignment.' Martin Wolf, Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times 'Official development assistance continues to be a key way to finance efforts aimed at eradicating extreme poverty. However, the challenge is more than governments alone can manage. We must all think, work, finance and deliver development differently to mobilize private-sector resources and expertise to help the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people. Canada continues to promote innovative approaches to finance development and achieve sustainable growth for everyone.' The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Canada's Minister of International Development and La Francophonie.
  • 30-August-2017

    English

    Amounts Mobilised from the Private Sector by Official Development Finance Interventions

    The 2016 survey shows that, in 2012-15, USD 81.1 billion was mobilised from the private sector by official development finance interventions in form of guarantees, syndicated loans, shares in collective investment vehicles (CIVs), credit lines and direct investment in companies.

    Related Documents
  • 11-July-2017

    English

    Information Note on the DAC Deflators

    The DAC deflators adjust for both price and exchange rate changes, so that all flows, from all donors, in all years, are expressed in terms of a readily understood fixed unit of measurement - the purchasing power of a US dollar in a recent year, referred to as the base year.

    Related Documents
  • 21-April-2017

    English

    Emerging providers’ international co-operation for development

    Development co-operation from countries beyond the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) significantly increased in recent years, reaching 17% of total global development co-operation in 2014. The policy paper presents an estimate, of USD 300 billion, of broader international co-operation by emerging providers and it sets out what types of instruments are used to provide this broader international co-operation.

    Related Documents
  • 18-April-2016

    English

    Development finance of countries beyond the DAC

    Beyond the members of the Development Assistance Committee, these providers of development co-operation also report their aid to us.

    Related Documents
  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Global aid prospects and projections

    For developing countries, uncertainty about funding can stand in the way of longer-term reforms. For donors, lack of transparency makes it harder to harmonise efforts.To promote transparency, we conduct annual surveys of donors' spending plans for the following years.

  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Multilateral Development Finance

    More than 200 multilateral agencies - such as the United Nations, the World Bank and the global funds - receive or serve as a channel for about one third of total ODA. Our work on multilateral aid provides a clearer picture of the multilateral system.

    Related Documents
  • 8-January-2016

    English

    Country programmable aid (CPA)

    Built on an earlier concept of “core” aid, we have developed the concept of country programmable aid (CPA). CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country.

    Related Documents
  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Resource flows beyond ODA in DAC statistics

    Since the Monterrey Consensus in 2002, discussions on external resources for development have increasingly paid attention to broad development finance, rather than focusing on ODA. In this context, the DAC is working to enhance its statistics on resource flows to developing countries beyond ODA

    Related Documents
  • 9-November-2015

    English

    Sustainable Development Investment Partnership

    A Sustainable Development Investment Partnership (SDIP) has been launched to mobilize $100 billion in private financing over five years for infrastructure projects in developing countries using development assistance to reduce risk.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 > >>