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  • 13-October-2021

    English

    OECD work on investment promotion and facilitation

    The OECD Investment Promotion Agency (IPA) Network supports IPAs to conduct analytical work and facilitate peer-learning in the area of investment promotion and facilitation. It provides a forum for discussion and experience sharing that facilitates the use of evidence-based analysis on investment and engagement with policy makers and IPAs from other countries and regions.

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  • 9-September-2021

    English

    OECD Global Blockchain Policy Forum 2021

    9-24 September 2021 - The annual OECD Global Blockchain Policy Forum brings together government, business and civil society stakeholders to address the benefits and risks of blockchain for our economies and societies, identify good policy and regulatory approaches, and investigate uses in specific policy areas.

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  • 1-September-2021

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Review of Shenzhen, China - A Journey of Continuous Learning

    Shenzhen is a stellar case of growth and economic transformation. Since its establishment as one of China’s first four Special Economic Zones in 1980, it has evolved at breakneck speed. Shenzhen transformed from a fishing village to a major world trade hub and is now home to global innovators in electronics. The Production Transformation Policy Review (PTPR) of Shenzhen, China reviews the city’s changing policy approaches, focusing on the shift from an assembly to a manufacturing centre and more recently to an innovation and start-up hub. Through a comprehensive assessment of Shenzhen’s experience, this review offers insights into the range of policies and strategies employed to stimulate industrial upgrading and learning in China. It provides lessons and actionable policy recommendations for the growth of cities and emerging economies in their catching-up journey. The PTPR of Shenzhen, China has been carried out in the framework of the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development and has benefitted from government-business dialogues and international peer learning (University of Seoul, Korea; University of Georgetown, USA and Digital India Foundation, India).
  • 5-August-2021

    English

    Fossil-Fuel Subsidies in the EU’s Eastern Partner Countries - Estimates and Recent Policy Developments

    Based on the OECD standard methodology, the study presents quantitative estimates of government support to consumers and producers of coal, oil and related petroleum products and natural gas, and electricity and heat generated from these fossil fuels. This report summarises the main findings of the analysis of fossil-fuel subsidy schemes in the six European's Union Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries – Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine. The study updates the 2018 Inventory of Energy Subsidies in the EU’s Eastern Partnership Countries by providing data and estimates for 2016‑19.The analysis focuses on measuring two major types of fossil-fuel subsidies: direct transfers of funds to producers and consumers; and tax expenditure. This report also briefly discusses the taxation and energy pricing policies that have had direct or indirect impact on the evolution of fossil-fuel subsidies in the region. Detailed estimates of all individual support measures for each of the six countries are provided in Annexes to the report.
  • 22-July-2021

    English

    Accessing and Using Green Finance in the Kyrgyz Republic - Evidence from a Household Survey

    This report presents findings from a survey on green finance conducted among 1 000 households in the Kyrgyz Republic (Kyrgyzstan) in 2019. Although green finance is an emerging trend, knowledge about the appetite for green financial products and services in Kyrgyzstan is almost inexistent. The OECD prepared the household survey to close this gap in evidence. The research identified needs and demand from existing and potential clients of Kyrgyz financial institutions for financial instruments, including those that promote sustainable development. This will help commercial banks, policy makers and central bankers design more targeted interventions to increase access to and use of financial products and services, including green finance, in Kyrgyzstan.
  • 12-July-2021

    English

    AI in Business and Finance

    With AI progressing rapidly in many domains, the OECD is examining the application of AI in a number of domains including finance, human rights, competition, foreign acquisitions and related security interests and SupTech tools that can ensure regulatory oversight and supervision.

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  • 12-July-2021

    English

    OECD Compendium of Productivity Indicators

    This Webbook provides a set of cross-country comparable statistics on labour productivity levels, the contributions of labour, capital services and multifactor productivity (MFP) to GDP growth, industry contributions to labour productivity growth, labour productivity gaps between SMEs and large firms, the evolution and composition of investment, the decoupling between real wages and productivity, and labour income share developments. It also includes a special chapter on productivity measurement and analysis at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • 12-July-2021

    English

    OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Uruguay

    In July 2020, the Investment Committee recommended to Council to invite Uruguay to become the 50th adherent to the OECD Declaration on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises. This OECD Investment Policy Review of Uruguay documents the progress made in recent years to align investment policies with the national development strategy in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Review also assesses remaining challenges in improving the business climate, in particular the actions needed to establish an enabling responsible business environment and ensure full application of the Declaration. Uruguay’s success in attracting more and better investment will make its economy more resilient and better prepared to accelerate the recovery after COVID-19.
  • 8-July-2021

    English

    New evidence on intangibles, diffusion and productivity

    This paper presents new evidence on the impact of intangible capital on productivity dispersion within industries. It first shows that rise in productivity dispersion after 2000 is more pronounced in intangible-intensive industries; then analyses the link between intangible capital intensity and productivity dispersion both at the top and at the bottom of the productivity distribution, and in different industries. The findings suggest that industries that have experienced a stronger increase in intangible investment have also seen a steeper rise in productivity dispersion both at the top and at the bottom of the productivity distribution. While the results at the top seem to be associated with the scalability of intangible capital – which is likely to disproportionally benefit high-productivity firms and incumbents – dispersion at the bottom appears to be linked to complementarities between intangible investment and factors like digital intensity, trade openness and venture capital.
  • 2-July-2021

    English

    Analysing sectoral capital flows - Covariates, co-movements, and controls

    This paper assembles a comprehensive sectoral capital flows dataset for 64 advanced and emerging economies from 2000-18. This includes direct, portfolio and other investments to and from five sectors: central banks (CB), general government (GG), banks (BKs), non-financial corporates (NFCs) and other financial corporates (OFCs) and a corresponding dataset on capital controls imposed on these sectors. The paper uses this data to examine the usefulness of a sectoral approach in assessing capital flow covariates, co-movements, and the effectiveness of capital controls. The findings show that: 1) private sectoral flows have varying sensitivities to global financial conditions and different cyclicality with respect to output growth. For instance, unlike other flows, NFCs respond to global commodity prices but not global risk aversion and, unlike banks, OFCs cut foreign investment in periods of domestic investment; 2) co-movements of resident and non-resident OFC sectoral flows add to the observed positive correlation between gross inflows and outflows; and, 3) the tightening of capital controls on NFCs and OFCs appear effective in reducing the volume of flows to these sectors.
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