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Publications & Documents


  • 30-June-2021

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Review of Shenzhen, China - A Journey of Continuous Learning

    Shenzhen is a stellar case of growth and economic transformation. Since its establishment as one of China’s first four Special Economic Zones in 1980, it has evolved at breakneck speed. Shenzhen transformed from a fishing village to a major world trade hub and is now home to global innovators in electronics. The Production Transformation Policy Review (PTPR) of Shenzhen, China reviews the city’s changing policy approaches, focusing on the shift from an assembly to a manufacturing centre and more recently to an innovation and start-up hub. Through a comprehensive assessment of Shenzhen’s experience, this review offers insights into the range of policies and strategies employed to stimulate industrial upgrading and learning in China. It provides lessons and actionable policy recommendations for the growth of cities and emerging economies in their catching-up journey. The PTPR of Shenzhen, China has been carried out in the framework of the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development and has benefitted from government-business dialogues and international peer learning (University of Seoul, Korea; University of Georgetown, USA and Digital India Foundation, India).
  • 10-May-2021

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Ireland 2021

    Ireland’s progress in delinking the economy from environmental pressures has been uneven in the last decade. Greenhouse gas emissions, waste generation and nutrient pollution rose with strong economic growth between the mid-2010s and the inception of the COVID‑19 pandemic. The country’s dispersed settlement pattern implies that roads are the dominant transport mode. Climate, circular economy and biodiversity policies have gained renewed impetus, with various ambitious policy initiatives and large public investment plans. These need to be swiftly implemented to alleviate the growing pressures from intensification of agricultural practices, demographic development, urban sprawl and road traffic. Encouraging businesses and households to take action is key. This requires providing consistent price signals for the use of energy and natural resources and for better managing travel demand, while taking into account affordability, employment impact and regional disparities. This is the third Environmental Performance Review of Ireland. It evaluates progress towards green growth and sustainable development, with a special chapter focusing on sustainable mobility and freight.
  • 7-May-2021

    English

    Lessons on engaging with the private sector to strengthen climate resilience in Guatemala, the Philippines and Senegal

    For many private sector actors, especially micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs), it remains challenging to understand how the impacts of climate change may influence their business profitability and continuity over time, and how they can manage climate risks. This working paper explores how governments and development co-operation providers can further engage with the private sector to address these challenges and strengthen its resilience to the negative impacts of climate change. The paper focuses on different roles of the private sector in strengthening climate resilience. It then examines how governments and development co-operation can foster such roles through enhancing domestic institutions and networks, policy frameworks, climate and weather data and information, and financing mechanisms. The proposed actions draw from the experiences of three case studies: Guatemala, the Philippines and Senegal.
  • 7-May-2021

    English

    To what extent can blockchain help development co-operation actors meet the 2030 Agenda?

    Blockchain is mainstreaming, but the number of blockchain for development use-cases with proven success beyond the pilot stage remain relatively few. This paper outlines key blockchain concepts and implications in order to help policymakers reach realistic conclusions when considering its use. The paper surveys the broad landscape of blockchain for development to identify where the technology can optimise development impact and minimise harm. It subsequently critically examines four successful applications, including the World Food Programme’s Building Blocks, Oxfam’s UnBlocked Cash project, KfW’s TruBudget and Seso Global. As part of the on-going work co-ordinated by the OECD’s Blockchain Policy Centre, this paper asserts that post-COVID-19, Development Assistance Committee (DAC) donors and their development partners have a unique opportunity to shape blockchain’s implementation.
  • 28-April-2021

    English

    Monitoring and Evaluating the Strategic Plan of Nuevo León 2015-2030 - Using Evidence to Achieve Sustainable Development

    Pursuing sustainable development requires a whole-of-society effort, where the public sector engages with citizens, the private sector and civil society organisations. With this goal in mind, in 2014, the Nuevo León (Mexico) government created the Nuevo León’s Council for Strategic Planning to develop, inter alia, a 2015-2030 Strategic Plan. This review provides an assessment of Nuevo León’s monitoring and evaluation systems for this Strategic Plan, as essential tools for achieving long-term objectives and delivering results. The review also assesses the general role of the Council in providing policy advice. It draws on a wealth of comparative international experiences in promoting sustainable development through long-term planning, as well as in monitoring and evaluation of policy priorities through inclusive and participatory processes. The report’s recommendations seek to promote an evidence-informed approach to public governance, and, ultimately, help Nuevo León deliver better results for citizens, paving the way for inclusive and sustainable development.
  • 27-April-2021

    English

    DAC and CRS code lists

    OECD maintains various codes lists which are used by donors to report on their aid flows to the DAC databases. In addition, these codes are used to classify information in the DAC databases.

  • 27-April-2021

    English

    Annex 2 List of ODA-eligible international organisations

    In reporting their ODA, donor countries refer to a List of ODA-eligible international organisations, including multilateral agencies, international NGOs, networks and PPPs.

  • 27-April-2021

    English

    OECD converts complete 2018 and final 2019 Creditor Reporting System (CRS) data into XML format, by donor and by recipient

    The OECD now provides the Creditor Reporting System (CRS) 2018 and final 2019 data available in XML format. CRS data on development finance can now be downloaded in four different formats and cater to different audiences.

  • 22-April-2021

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2021

    This report compiles comparable tax revenue statistics over the period 1990-2019 for 27 Latin American and Caribbean economies. Based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, it applies the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to enable comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with other economies. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The 2021 edition is produced with the support of the EU Regional Facility for Development in Transition for Latin America and the Caribbean, which results from joint work led by the European Union, the OECD and its Development Centre, and ECLAC.
  • 16-April-2021

    English

    Transition Finance Compendium - Challenges and recommendations for the Development Assistance Committee

    Building on the evidence collected through seven country pilots, this Transition Finance Compendium concludes that more could be done to build the resilience of ODA. The analyses carried out suggests that official development assistance (ODA) trends should not be observed in isolation of other sources of financing for sustainable development since transition finance is about the progressive substitution of external financing by domestic public resources and private investment mobilised. It finds that further planning and co-ordination of DAC members’ exit and phasing-out strategies or decisions could generate ODA efficiency gains and resilience; that the increasing complexity of the financing for sustainable development (FSD) landscape creates not only opportunities for access to additional sources of financing, but also risks; and concludes on emerging recommendations for the DAC to better prepare transition, e.g. good practices/relevant standards and tools for transition finance. It ends suggesting how the DAC can move from transition finance diagnostics to implementation.
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