• 26-May-2014

    English, PDF, 191kb

    Obesity Update 2014: Key Facts for Switzerland

    Obesity rates are low in Switzerland, relative to most OECD countries. 9% of adults are obese in Switzerland, while nearly 38% are overweight (including obesity).

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  • 15-April-2014


    Taxing Wages: Country note for Switzerland

    The average worker in Switzerland faced a tax burden on labour income (tax wedge) of 22.0% in 2013 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%. Switzerland was ranked 29 of the 34 OECD member countries in this respect.

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  • 18-March-2014

    English, PDF, 362kb

    Society at a Glance 2014 - Key findings for Switzerland

    This note presents key findings for Switzerland from Society at a Glance 2014 - OECD Social indicators. This 2014 publication also provides a special chapter on: the crisis and its aftermath: a “stress test” for societies and for social policies.

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  • 11-February-2014


    Switzerland - DAC Peer Review of Development Co-operation, 2013

    In a new Peer Review of Switzerland, the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) welcomed the country’s progress in channelling more resources into fighting poverty and sharpening its development policies in line with the DAC’s 2009 recommendations.

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  • 23-January-2014


    Mental Health and Work: Switzerland

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is becoming a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on Switzerland is the fifth in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It concludes that the Swiss system is well resourced to address the challenges in various policy fields; that due the involvemnet of a large number of stakeholders much needed policy coordination across different sectors is a difficult task; and that a stronger mental health focus is required in Switzerland's health, social and labour market policies.

  • 26-November-2013

    English, PDF, 459kb

    Pensions at a Glance 2013 - Highlights for Switzerland

    Income-poverty rates are high among the over-65s in Switzerland. The effective age of labour market exit is high in Switzerland in international comparison...

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  • 20-June-2013


    Education at a Glance 2013 - Country notes and key fact tables

    Education at a Glance 2013 - Country notes and key fact tables

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  • 26-April-2013


    OECD Central Government Debt Statistics 2012

    Governments are major issuers of debt instruments in the global financial market. This volume provides quantitative information on central government debt instruments for the 34 OECD member countries to meet the analytical requirements of users such as policy makers, debt management experts and market analysts.  Statistics are presented according to a comprehensive standard framework to allow cross-country comparison.  Country methodological notes provide information on debt issuance in each country as well as on the institutional and regulatory framework governing debt management policy and selling techniques.
  • 7-January-2013

    English, PDF, 1,739kb

    A Skills beyond School Review of Switzerland

    This review is one of a series of country reports on postsecondary vocational education and training (VET) in OECD countries, prepared as part of an OECD study. The series includes reviews, (such as this one) involving an in-depth analysis of a country system leading to a set of policy recommendations backed by analysis.

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  • 3-July-2012


    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Switzerland 2012

    This 2012 IEA review of Swiss energy policies finds that Switzerland has taken bold decisions to gradually phase out nuclear power and to reduce by a fifth its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 with domestic measures only. These are challenging objectives, and the country now needs to identify the most viable ways to meet them at least cost and minimum risk to energy security.

    In the absence of nuclear power, maintaining sufficient electricity capacity will require strong policies to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy. Such measures have already been outlined, but they will likely not be enough. For baseload generation, gas-fired power plants would be the simplest option. Treating their CO2 emissions the same way as in the neighbouring countries would be a strong positive incentive for investors.

    Because Switzerland’s energy-related CO2 emissions come mostly from oil use in transport and space heating, action is most needed in these areas. Commendably, the country is making polluters pay by using a CO2 tax for financing decarbonisation efforts in space heating. Stronger efforts will be needed to reduce emissions from private car use, however.

    Since the 2007 IEA energy policy review, Switzerland has made clear progress in electricity market reform. Moving to a fully open market by 2015 would be a further positive step. The system of regulated end-user prices, however, is subsidising electricity consumption at a time when low-carbon power supply is becoming more constrained and expensive. It should be reconsidered. Switzerland should also continue to take an increasingly European approach to developing its electricity infrastructure, to its own benefit and to that of its neighbours.
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