Reports


  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Regulatory Policy: Mexico

    Access latest developments on regulatory policy in Mexico and its score on the 2015 Indicators of Regulatory Policy and Governance. Access all reports on regulatory policy in Mexico.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Taxing Wages: Mexico

    The tax burden on labour income is expressed by the tax wedge, which is a measure of the net tax burden on labour income borne by the employee and the employer.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English, PDF, 176kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Mexico

    Mexico has the 3rd lowest tax wedge among the 34 OECD member countries. The country occupied the same position in 2014. The average single worker in Mexico faced a tax wedge of 19.7% in 2015, compared with the OECD average of 35.9%.

  • 1-April-2016

    English

    National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts 2015

    The 2015 edition of National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts is an annual publication, dedicated to government finance which is based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (SNA 2008) for all countries except Chile, Japan, Korea and Turkey (SNA 1993). It includes tables showing government aggregates and balances for the production, income and financial accounts as well as detailed tax and social contribution receipts and a breakdown of expenditure of general government by function, according to the harmonised international classification, COFOG. These detailed accounts are available for the general government sector. Data also cover the following sub-sectors, according to availability: central government, state government, local government and social security funds.

    The data in this publication are also available on line via www.oecd-ilibrary.org under the title OECD National Accounts Statistics, General Government Accounts (http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga-data-en and http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga08-data-en).

  • 15-February-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Systems: A series of country reports

    Those in-depth studies of the health system of member countries focus on economic issues. They assess the performance of health systems in a comparative context, identify the main challenges faced by the country health system and put forward policy options to better meet them. Reviews are initiated at the request of the country to be examined and emphasis is placed on specific issues of key policy interest.

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  • 12-February-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Mexico

    This review assesses the Mexican pension system according to the OECD best practices and guidelines, and draws on international experiences and examples to make recommendations on how to improve it. It provides an international perspective on Mexico’s retirement income provision and a short and focused review of the Mexican pension system. The review covers all components of the pension system: public and private pension provision for public and private-sector workers. It provides recommendations, using OECD’s best practices in pension design, on how to improve the Mexican pension system and thus ameliorate the retirement income that people may receive from the pension system.

  • 10-February-2016

    English, PDF, 273kb

    Low Performing Students: Mexico (English)

    In 2012, 55% of students in Mexico were low performers in mathematics (OECD average: 23%), 41% were low performers in reading (OECD average: 18%), 47% were low performers in science (OECD average: 18%), and 31% were low performers in all three of these subjects (OECD average: 12%)

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  • 4-February-2016

    English

    Mexico - Financing Democracy: Funding of Political Parties and Election Campaigns and the Risk of Policy Capture

    This case study presents the legislation and compliance framework for the Mexican political system. It also includes information on public and private funding of political parties, candidates and campaigns. This chapter includes information taken from documents elaborated by the International Affairs Unit of the National Electoral Institute of Mexico.

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  • 22-January-2016

    English

    Improving ISSSTE's Public Procurement for Better Results

    OECD countries are increasingly attempting to achieve savings through their public procurement systems, in particular in healthcare. In 2012, the State’s Employees’ Social Security and Social Services Institute in Mexico (ISSSTE) asked the OECD to review the effectiveness and integrity of its procurement system and to address bid-rigging. Many of the OECD’s recommendations led to enduring reforms at ISSSTE. In 2015 the OECD conducted a new review focusing on planning and coordination of procurement activities, market research and improvement of medical services. This report presents the findings of the review and notes the ISSSTE’s recent achievements. It also makes recommendations to support the alignment of the ISSSTE’s procurement practices with the 2015 OECD Recommendation of the Council on Public Procurement and includes action plans for priority activities.

  • 7-January-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Systems: Mexico 2016

    Ten years after the introduction of publically-funded universal health insurance, the Mexican health system finds itself at a critical juncture. Unquestionably, some measures of health and health system performance have improved: those previously uninsured now use health services more often, whilst numbers reporting impoverishing health expenditure having fallen from 3.3% to 0.8%. Other indicators, however, remain worrying. Rates of survival after heart attack or stroke are markedly worse than in other OECD countries. Prevention is a particular concern: with 32% of the adult population obese, Mexico ranks as the second most obese nation in the OECD and almost 1 in 6 adults are diabetic. Other key metrics imply deep-rooted inefficiencies in the system: administrative costs, at 8.9% of total health spending, are the highest in the OECD and have not reduced over the past decade. Likewise, out-of-pocket spending has stuck at nearly 50% of total health spending - the highest in the OECD - and implies that individuals feel the need to visit private clinic despite having health insurance. In short, Mexico’s massive public investment in its health system has failed to translate into better health and health system performance to the extent wished and a programme of continued, extensive reform is needed. This report sets out the OECD’s recommendations on the steps Mexico should take to achieve this.

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