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Economy


  • 22-April-2021

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2021

    This report compiles comparable tax revenue statistics over the period 1990-2019 for 27 Latin American and Caribbean economies. Based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, it applies the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to enable comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with other economies. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The 2021 edition is produced with the support of the EU Regional Facility for Development in Transition for Latin America and the Caribbean, which results from joint work led by the European Union, the OECD and its Development Centre, and ECLAC.
  • 17-November-2020

    English

    The impact of COVID-19 on SME financing - A special edition of the OECD Financing SMEs and Entrepreneurs Scoreboard

    The COVID-19 crisis has had a profound impact on SME access to finance. In particular, the sudden drop in revenues created acute liquidity shortages, threatening the survival of many viable businesses. The report documents an increase in demand for bank lending in the first half of 2020, and a steady supply of credit thanks to government interventions. On the other hand, other sources of finance declined, in particular early-stage equity. This paper, a special edition of Financing SMEs and Entrepreneurs, focuses on the impacts of COVID-19 on SME access to finance, along with government policy responses. It reveals that the pre-crisis financing environment was broadly favourable for SMEs and entrepreneurs, who benefited from low interest rates, loose credit standards and an increasingly diverse offer of financing instruments. It documents the unprecedented scope and scale of the policy responses undertaken by governments world-wide, and details their key characteristics, and outlines the principal issues and policy challenges for the next phases of the pandemic, such as the over-indebtedness of SMEs and the need to continue to foster a diverse range of financing instruments for SMEs.
  • 8-October-2020

    English

    Tijuana Innovadora 2020: Tijuana is the Future

    The economic repercussions are stark. Global GDP will decline by 4.5% this year, and while we estimate that the global economy will pick up by an average rate of around 5% in 2021, many OECD countries will not return to their pre-crisis growth rates until the end of 2021 or in 2022.

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  • 7-October-2020

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, participating in Tijuana Innovadora 2020: Tijuana is the Future, 7 October 2020

    The Secretary-General took part in the panel on Economy with Ms. Alicia Bárcena, Executive Secretary of ECLAC, and with Ms. Rebeca Grynspan, Secretary-General of the SEGIB.

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  • 14-April-2020

    English

    Synthesising good practices in fiscal federalism - Key recommendations from 15 years of country surveys

    The design of intergovernmental fiscal relations can help to ensure that tax and spending powers are assigned in a way to promote sustainable and inclusive economic growth. Decentralisation can enable sub-central governments to provide better public services for households and firms, while it can also make intergovernmental frameworks more complex, harming equity. The challenges of fiscal federalism are multi-faceted and involve difficult trade-offs. This synthesis paper consolidates much of the OECD’s work on fiscal federalism over the past 15 years, with a particular focus on OECD Economic Surveys. The paper identifies a range of good practices on the design of country policies and institutions related strengthening fiscal capacity delineating responsibilities across evels of government and improving intergovernmental co-ordination.
  • 31-January-2020

    English, PDF, 343kb

    Mexico Policy Brief - Addressing the Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus

    Informality remains high by international standards, estimated to involve 60% of all workers, and about one quarter of Mexico’s GDP.

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  • 10-January-2020

    English

    ITAM Seminar on Economic Perspectives

    Even though the global economy continues to grow and there are some positive aspects to highlight, such as an adequate and responsible monetary policy stance in the major central banks, the international economic landscape looks very complex.

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  • 8-January-2020

    English

    Dialogue with the Mexican Business Sector: OECD Economic Outlook

    The clouds gathered over the global economy are not dissipating. Every time we updated our growth projections over the past year, the data were down. We now estimate that, after 2.9% in 2019, the world economy should grow at a similar rate during 2020 and 2021.

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  • 3-January-2020

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Mexico, from 6 to 10 January 2020

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Mexico, from 6 to 10 January 2020 on an official visit. He will hold bilateral meetings with Mexican high-level officials.

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  • 15-May-2019

    English

    Administrative Simplification in the Mexican Social Security Institute

    This report assesses the impact on citizens and businesses of the administrative simplification measures carried out by the Mexican Social Security Institute. Administrative burdens are measured in the time it takes citizens and businesses to complete forms and wait in line to request or deliver information to the government. Using an adaptation of the Standard Cost Model, this report finds that such burdens for users have decreased by at least 25% thanks to the simplification and digitalisation of administrative formalities. It also suggests how the Institute could reduce burdens even further. By promoting the use of online formalities, IMSS could reduce administrative burdens by an additional 11%.
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