Share

By Date


  • 7-July-2021

    English

    Iceland: increase competition and economic diversification to support the recovery from COVID-19, says OECD

    Rising exports are helping to restore economic growth in Iceland after the blow from the COVID-19 crisis, even though tourism is still recovering. Further diversifying the economy and pursuing structural reforms to boost productivity growth will be key to building a strong and sustainable recovery, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 25-May-2021

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Iceland (Stage 2) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 2 peer monitoring of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Iceland.
  • 19-May-2021

    English, PDF, 177kb

    Preventing Harmful Alcohol Use: Key Findings for Iceland

    Iceland consumes 9.1 litres of pure alcohol per capita per year, roughly equivalent to 1.9 bottles of wine or 3.5 litres of beer per week per person aged 15 and over. In addition, in Iceland, some population groups are at higher risk than others.

  • 28-April-2021

    English

    The Economic Benefits of Air Quality Improvements in Arctic Council Countries

    The Arctic is a vital region that helps preserve the balance of the global climate. The Arctic environment is particularly sensitive to short-lived climate pollutants, including black carbon, due to their strong warming effect. With ambitious policy action to reduce air pollutants, Arctic Council countries would obtain a positive effect on health and the environment throughout their territory, while also helping to slow down climate change by reducing emissions of black carbon. This report calls for ambitious policy action to reduce air pollution in Arctic Council countries, highlighting the environmental, health, and economic benefits from policy action.
  • 17-March-2021

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

    Related Documents
  • 17-December-2020

    English

    Iceland should step up efforts to detect and enforce its foreign bribery offences

    Detection of foreign bribery, as well as awareness of related risks, are still lacking in Iceland. In spite of having been one of the original signatories to the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, Iceland has only recently commenced its first foreign bribery investigation. Detection of foreign bribery by the Icelandic authorities needs therefore to be significantly improved.

    Related Documents
  • 17-December-2020

    English

    Iceland - OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

    This page contains all information relating to implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in Iceland.

    Related Documents
  • 3-December-2020

    English, PDF, 370kb

    Revenue Statistics: Key findings for Iceland

    The OECD’s annual Revenue Statistics report found that the tax-to-GDP ratio in Iceland decreased by 1.1 percentage points from 37.2% in 2018 to 36.1% in 2019. Between 2018 and 2019 the OECD average decreased from 33.9% to 33.8%.

  • 30-November-2020

    English

    Building a High-Quality Early Childhood Education and Care Workforce - Further Results from the Starting Strong Survey 2018

    The work of early childhood education and care (ECEC) professionals is the major driver of the quality of an ECEC system. As evidence accumulates on the strong benefits of investing in early education, countries need effective policies to attract, maintain and retain a highly skilled workforce in the sector. This report looks at the makeup of the early childhood education and care workforce across countries, assessing how initial preparation programmes compare across different systems, what types of in-service training and informal learning activities help staff to upgrade their skills, and what staff say about their working conditions, as well as identifying policies that can reduce staff stress levels and increase well-being at work. The report also looks at which leadership and managerial practices in ECEC centres contribute to improving the skills, working conditions and working methods of staff. The OECD Starting Strong Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS Starting Strong) is the first international survey that focuses on the early childhood education and care workforce. It offers an opportunity to learn about the characteristics of ECEC staff and centre leaders, their practices at work, and their views on the profession and the sector. This second volume of findings, Building a High-Quality Early Childhood Education and Care Workforce, examines factors that influence the skills development of ECEC professionals, their working conditions and well-being at work, and leadership in ECEC centres.
  • 23-September-2020

    English

    A territorial approach to the Sustainable Development Goals in Kópavogur, Iceland

    Kópavogur was the first municipality in Iceland to formally embrace the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In September 2018, the Municipal Council adopted a holistic strategy for Kópavogur, based on the 15 prioritised SDGs and their 36 targets. The city is following a data-driven approach to implement the SDGs as a tool for public sector innovation and to bring all the municipality’s actions under one strategic framework. The city is also using the SDGs to build awareness and strengthen ownership of the local strategy among private sector and civil society. The case of Kópavogur also points to the importance of addressing the SDGs through an integrated and functional approach, since many sustainable development challenges span beyond sole perimeter of the city and require close cooperation with the hinterland, as in the case of public transport and waste management.
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>