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  • 4-August-2020

    English

    Waiting Times

    Long waiting times for health services have been an important policy issue in most OECD countries for many years. The COVID-19 outbreak is likely to result in at least some temporary increases in waiting times for non-urgent services in all the OECD countries that have been hard hit.

  • 24-July-2020

    English, PDF, 6,063kb

    Trustworthy artificial intelligence in health

    This paper discusses the promises and perils of AI in health, and the key policy questions that policy makers will need to address in an uncertain landscape. The goal is to foster a shared understanding and to inform a G20 dialogue on AI on the main policy issues of AI use in the health sector.

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  • 2-July-2020

    English

    OECD Health Statistics 2020

    OECD Health Statistics 2020 is the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. All online datasets have been updated on 1 July 2020.

  • 29-June-2020

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, at Fundación Euroamérica Webinar, Monday 29 June 2020

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, delivered remarks, followed by a Q&A, at a Webinar organised by Fundación Euroamérica, on Monday 29 June 2020 under the title “COVID-19 and Latin America: Priorities against the pandemic and for the recovery”.

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  • 23-June-2020

    English

    OECD Secretary-General's Report to Ministers 2020

    The OECD works on finding evidence-based solutions to a range of social, economic and environmental challenges, promoting 'Better Policies for Better Lives'. The global spread of coronavirus in 2020 has made the commitment to this motto all the more relevant. This edition of the OECD Secretary-General's Report to Ministers outlines the main achievements of the OECD in 2019. It describes the OECD’s work on economics, employment, education, health, inequalities, the environment, tax and many other fields in the context of a rapidly changing world. It includes the activities of the Secretary-General and his office, as well as those of OECD directorates, agencies, special entities and advisory committees. The OECD is one of the world’s largest and most trusted sources of comparable statistical data and research. It is also a unique forum and knowledge hub for exchange of experiences, best-practice sharing, and advice on public policies and global standard-setting. This year will mark the 60th anniversary of the Organisation, and this will be the opportunity to reflect on the past, and develop a vision for the future. More than ever, we need evidence-based policies geared towards building societies and economies that are more resilient, inclusive and sustainable.
  • 22-June-2020

    English

    Long-term care workforce: caring for the ageing population with dignity

    The OECD examines barriers to and policy options for promoting a stronger LTC workforce. Some of the themes analysed include education and training, recruitment and retention, productivity and use of technology, coordination between social and health workers, and coordination between formal and informal workers.

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  • 22-June-2020

    English

    Who Cares? Attracting and Retaining Care Workers for the Elderly

    This report presents the most up-to-date and comprehensive cross-country assessment of long-term care (LTC) workers, the tasks they perform and the policies to address shortages in OECD countries. It highlights the importance of improving working conditions in the sector and making care work more attractive and shows that there is space to increase productivity by enhancing the use of technology, providing a better use of skills and investing in prevention. Population ageing has outpaced the growth of workers in the long-term care (LTC) sector and the sector struggles with attracting and retaining enough workers to care for those dependent on others for care. Non-standard work is widespread, pay levels tend to be lower than similar-qualification jobs in other health sectors, and LTC workers experience more health problems than other health workers. Further, educational requirements tend to be insufficient to perform more demanding and growing tasks of LTC. With growing demand for care at home, better co-ordination between the health and long-term care sectors and between formal and informal careers is needed.
  • 16-June-2020

    English

    Latin America and the Caribbean countries need to spend more and better on health to be better able to face a major health emergency like COVID-19 effectively

    Health spending in Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC) was about USD 1,000 per person in 2017, only ¼ of what was spent in OECD countries (adjusted for purchasing power). At the same time, health systems’ capacity is also considerably lower, including the ability to provide access to services of good quality to the most vulnerable groups.

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  • 16-June-2020

    English

    Health at a Glance: Latin America and the Caribbean 2020

    Health at a Glance: Latin America and the Caribbean 2020 presents key indicators on health and health systems in 33 Latin America and the Caribbean countries. This first Health at a Glance publication to cover the Latin America and the Caribbean region was prepared jointly by OECD and the World Bank. Analysis is based on the latest comparable data across almost 100 indicators including equity, health status, determinants of health, health care resources and utilisation, health expenditure and financing, and quality of care. The editorial discusses the main challenges for the region brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, such as managing the outbreak as well as mobilising adequate resources and using them efficiently to ensure an effective response to the epidemic. An initial chapter summarises the comparative performance of countries before the crisis, followed by a special chapter about addressing wasteful health spending that is either ineffective or does not lead to improvement in health outcomes so that to direct saved resources where they are urgently needed.
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  • 2-June-2020

    English

    Culture as a cure - Assessments of patient safety culture in OECD countries

    While health care quality has been improving on average in OECD members countries, patient safety remains a central priority for policy makers and health care leaders. A growing research body has found that PSC is associated with numerous positive outcomes, including improved health outcomes, improved patient experience, and organisational productivity and staff satisfaction. Tools to measure PSC have proliferated in recent decades and are now in wide-spread use. This report includes findings from OECD countries on the state of the art for measurement practices related to PSC. Overall, measurement of PSC is prevalent across OECD countries, though the application, purpose, and tools vary. International learning and benchmarking has significant potential for better understanding and improvement of patient safety and health care quality.
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