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  • 19-October-2022

    English

    Scotland’s Approach to Regulating Water Charges - Innovation and Collaboration

    The price regulation conducted by economic regulators is a high-stakes process, with significant and lasting impacts on current and future service quality and the overall performance of the regulated sector. This report tracks the efforts of the economic regulator of the Scottish water sector to make the results of its price-setting process work better for the customers of today and tomorrow, addressing issues such as customer engagement, sustainable asset management and climate change. Based on the results of a multi-year peer review, it analyses the process and outputs of the price setting process. It also sets out recommendations to help parties strengthen the resilience and stability of the regulatory framework while not losing sight of strategic vision and objectives.
  • 6-October-2022

    English

    Anticipatory Innovation Governance Model in Finland - Towards a New Way of Governing

    This report examined how Finland has been incorporating anticipatory functions within its governance system to deal with complex and future challenges in a systemic way. The report applies a new model of anticipatory innovation governance (AIG), developed by the OECD, addressing a considerable gap in prior knowledge and guidance on how governments prepare for unknowable futures. It consists of three parts: an overview of the anticipatory innovation governance model; the assessment of the anticipatory innovation capacity of the Finnish Government; and the pilot case studies, where the principles and functions of the model are explored in practice.
  • 5-October-2022

    English

    Good practice principles for ethical behavioural science in public policy

    For the past decade, behavioural science has been influencing public policy by applying principles of psychology, cognitive and social sciences, neuroscience and economics, to put individuals at the forefront of policy goals, and with an accurate rather than imagined understanding of human behaviour. Like any policy-making tool, the use of behavioural insights must be subject to ethical considerations that can arise at any point from scoping to policy scaling. This good practice guide offers practitioners and policy makers step-by-step guidance to prompt deliberations into how to use behavioural science ethically for public policy. It is designed to be a practical resource to promote the responsible use of behavioural science in the public sector.
  • 4-October-2022

    English

    Regulatory policy 2.0 - Viewpoints and beliefs about better regulation: A report from the “Q exercise”

    Regulatory policy today is still grounded in principles and tools designed a few decades ago, but the context has changed significantly. To determine whether the current framework can help countries meet the challenges of contemporary societies, the OECD launched the Regulatory Policy 2.0 project. This report sets out the results from the second phase of the project, which included an exercise to map beliefs around better regulation. The exercise, involving government officials and regulatory experts, has identified four internally coherent belief systems about what better regulation is today, which core aims it should have, and where it should go in the future. Based on this analysis, the report provides empirical evidence and implications for the future direction of regulatory policy.
  • 30-September-2022

    English

    Could insurance provide an alternative to fiscal support in crisis response?

    The COVID-19 pandemic led to significant economic disruptions and revenue losses for business impacted by workplace closure measures aimed at restraining the spread of the virus. Governments provided extensive monetary and fiscal support to address liquidity risks and mitigate the potential for mass insolvencies as few businesses had applicable insurance coverage for these types of losses. This paper examines the fiscal and insurance sector responses to the economic disruptions resulting from COVID-19 workplace closures, the challenges to the availability of insurance coverage for this risk and some of the challenges and risks related to large-scale fiscal support for businesses. It also includes a discussion of the potential contribution of a loss-sharing arrangement between governments and insurance markets for pandemic-related business interruption losses as a means of enhancing the contribution of insurance markets to providing financial protection in the context of future pandemics.
  • 28-September-2022

    English

    Digital Government Review of Luxembourg - Towards More Digital, Innovative and Inclusive Public Services

    Digital government has become a priority for Luxembourg as a means to enable its public sector to deliver more responsive and trusted services. The Digital Government Review of Luxembourg evaluates the efforts made by the government to transition towards a digital government approach. It provides in-depth analysis and policy recommendations to improve institutional governance, digital investments, digital talent and skills, government service delivery and the strategic use of data. Its findings can help Luxembourg achieve a more digitally mature and data-driven administration to better serve citizens and businesses.
  • 27-September-2022

    English

    Rule of Law and Governance in the Palestinian Authority - Delivering Better Policies and Legislation for People

    Sound policy making and regulatory policy are critical for responsive, efficient government and public service delivery. This report analyses the institutional and policy framework for policy making and regulatory policy in the Palestinian Authority. It includes recommendations for improving the planning and co-ordination of policy making and legislative commitments and for enhancing regulatory and operational guidance for harmonised policy and law development. The first part provides a general analysis of the different stages of policy design, while the second part focusses more specifically on regulatory policy and related impact assessment tools.
  • 24-September-2022

    English

    OECD Guidelines for Citizen Participation Processes

    The OECD Guidelines for Citizen Participation Processes are intended for any public official or public institution interested in carrying out a citizen participation process. The guidelines describe ten steps for designing, planning, implementing and evaluating a citizen participation process, and discuss eight different methods for involving citizens: information and data, open meetings, public consultations, open innovation, citizen science, civic monitoring, participatory budgeting and representative deliberative processes. The guidelines are illustrated with examples as well as practical guidance built on evidence gathered by the OECD. Finally, nine guiding principles are presented to help ensure the quality of these processes.
  • 22-September-2022

    English

    Accessible and inclusive public communication - Panorama of practices from OECD countries

    Accessible and inclusive public communication helps to ensure that all citizens, regardless of their circumstances, can be heard and participate in public life. As part of a collaboration with the French Government Information Service and the activities of the OECD Experts Group on Public Communication, this working paper presents a range of practices and lessons learned about accessible and inclusive public communication in OECD member and partner countries, with a particular focus on persons with a disability. It covers trends, successes and challenges related to governance, audience insights and engagement, digital tools and processes, awareness-raising and training, as well as evaluation of accessibility and inclusion in public communication.
  • 22-September-2022

    English

    Public communication trends after COVID-19 - Innovative practices across the OECD and in four Southeast Asian countries

    Reflecting on the experiences of responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, this OECD working paper illustrates selected international trends that are driving innovation in the practice of public communication across the OECD to make it more inclusive, responsive and compelling. These include advanced uses of 'big data' and analytics to power precise, targeted communication, collaboration with trusted third-party messengers in diverse communities, and the application of behavioural insights (BI) to communication. In turn, these trends can help promote the use of public communication for policy, openness and dialogue. The paper reflects on the implications of these international trends for four countries in Southeast Asia, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. It looks at local lessons from the pandemic response and identifies avenues for adopting global good practices more widely. The paper focuses on a set of institutional prerequisites, including fostering a culture of innovation in public communication mandates and approaches, ensuring access to specialised skillsets, and strengthening ethical guidance in the use of new technologies and BI.
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