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Domestic philanthropy in emerging countries

Philanthropy for development is rising in emerging markets, and reliable information will help understand its scope, scale and effectiveness. The OECD Centre on Philanthropy is carrying out primary research on what foundations are contributing to in 5 emerging economies: China, Colombia, India, Nigeria and South Africa.

Domestic and Cross-border Philanthropy for Development and Gender Equality in China, 2016-19

New research on philanthropy in China compares what largest 62 domestic philanthropic foundations in China, and the largest 45 cross-border foundations active in China, are contributing to development in the country. Domestic philanthropy in China has significantly outpaced philanthropic funding coming from foundations based in other countries, but like other emerging markets, domestic philanthropy is highly concentrated within the country in just a few regions. The report further discusses the diverging sectoral focuses of domestic and cross-border philanthropy in China, and makes recommendations for geographic transparency, diversification of sectoral allocation, increased focus on gender equality, and partnerships between domestic and international organisations.


 

  • Read the full report - Forthcoming

Taking stock: Domestic Philanthropy and Corporate Social Responsibility for Gender Equality in India

Philanthropy, both domestic and international, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) are supporting gender equality in India. In recent years, the introduction of the 2013 Companies Act, which mandates and regulates CSR, has substantially increased resources towards development projects in the country. Using data from 183 organisations, this study charts the sectoral and geographical allocation of philanthropic and CSR giving in India for 2016-19, and estimates financing that aims to tackle gender inequalities. The report finds that philanthropy towards gender equality continues to be limited and dispersed within India, and in some areas, such as support to women’s organisations, is not allocated towards states with the highest needs.

The findings and recommendations in the report will help CSR and foundations ensure a needs-based sectoral and geographical allocation of their resources, and provides suggestions on how the Indian government can improve the tracking of CSR and philanthropic support for gender equality. 

 

Domestic Philanthropy for Development and Gender Equality in Colombia

The OECD, in partnership with the Asociación de Fundaciones Empresariales y Familiares de Colombia (AFE) conducted a survey of 54 of the largest private philanthropic organisations’ in Colombia to chart their domestic philanthropic giving towards development.

The findings and recommendations in the report will enable Colombian philanthropic organisations to better align their objectives, by learning from each other’s experiences and scaling-up program collaboration. The report specifically explores the allocation of resources within different thematic areas and regions within the country, describes the collaborative network of co-financing between domestic foundations, and provides an in-depth focus on how Colombian philanthropic giving supports gender equality.

 An open-access dashboard is available to help navigate the dataset. The dashboard helps users explore the dataset interactively, as well as customize and download data tables and figures for additional analysis.

Domestic Philanthropy for Development and Gender Equality in Nigeria

Nigeria is one of the largest recipients of international philanthropic funding, but little is known about its domestic philanthropy.

This report offers an insight into the philanthropy of a group of 12 domestic foundations in Nigeria for 2013-18, comparing it with other sources of development finance, like cross-border philanthropy and official development assistance (ODA) towards Nigeria.

The report also shows how domestic and cross-border philanthropy advance the country's gender equality agenda. Although Nigeria has made significant progress on gender equality, it still lags when compared with other countries in various dimensions, with persistent gender gaps in educational attainment, economic empowerment, political voice and individual agency.

Ultimately, the report makes recommendations on how to improve the transparency of the Nigerian philanthropic sector.

 

 

Domestic Philanthropy for Development and Gender Equality in South Africa

South Africa is one of the largest recipients of financing from international foundations, but little is known about domestic philanthropy. The OECD, in partnership with the Independent Philanthropy Association of South Africa (IPASA), surveyed some of the largest organisations in South Africa to chart how philanthropic resources are helping advance the country's development agenda. The report describes the results from a survey of 31 organisations, covering their projects and grants between 2013-18, exploring the allocation of resources in different thematic areas and geographies, and providing an in-depth focus on how domestic philanthropy supports gender equality. This will enable domestic philanthropic organisations to better align their priorities, learn from each other’s experiences, and explore scaling-up their programs partnerships.

An open-access dashboard is available to help navigate the dataset. While the report presents summary statistics and figures on an aggregated level, the dashboard helps users explore the dataset interactively, as well as customize and download data tables and figures for additional analysis.

 

India's Private Giving: Unpacking Domestic Philanthropy and Corporate Social Responsibility

 

India is the largest recipient of financing from international foundations (OECD, 2018), yet little is known about domestic philanthropy. The OECD has compiled information from some of the largest organisations in India to start charting how these resources are advancing the country's development agenda.

The report describes the results from a survey of 50 organisations, showing how domestic philanthropy surpasses international philanthropy in scope and scale, and how it allocates it’s resources in different areas and geographies in India, drawing comparisons with other key sources of finance like Official Development Assistance and public social spending. This information will enable foundations and companies alike to align their work better, in order to achieve a higher impact by scaling-up their programs and grants through networks of partnerships. The report and latest data on philanthropy and CSR in India are both freely available.