China (People’s Republic of)


  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 94kb

    Going for growth 2015 - China

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for China identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

  • 18-December-2014

    English

    Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India 2015 - Strengthening Institutional Capacity

    The Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India is an annual publication on Asia’s regional economic growth, development and regional integration process. It focuses on the economic conditions of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member countries  – Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam –, and also addresses relevant

  • 12-November-2014

    English

    Emerging Asia to see healthy medium-term growth but institutional reforms will be critical for future, says the OECD Development Centre

    While the outlook for many OECD countries remains subdued, Emerging Asia is set for healthy growth over the medium term. Annual GDP growth for the ASEAN -10, China and India is forecast to average 6.5% over 2015-19. Growth momentum remains robust in the 10 ASEAN countries, with economic growth averaging 5.6% over 2015-19.

  • 9-November-2014

    English

    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Economic Leaders' Meeting: Summit Dialogue on Economic Reforms

    Because the OECD is not only a “Global Standard Setter and a house for best practices”. It is also a pathfinder for effective implementation and we will be very proud to share our experience and expertise with APEC member economies and their business circles to develop innovative ideas and practical tools for competitive economies and inclusive societies!

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  • 20-October-2014

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD in Beijing, China, from 20 to 22 October 2014

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Beijing, from 20 to 22 October 2014 to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Finance Ministers Meetings.

  • 21-March-2014

    English, PDF, 2,042kb

    China: Structural reforms for inclusive growth

    In spite of a slow and uneven global recovery over the past five years, China has maintained strong growth and continued to tackle income inequality, which had been rising, as well as poverty. Drawing on the expertise and collective experience of OECD member and partner countries, this Report presents recent OECD analysis and policy advice in areas that are critical to China’s long-term economic performance and social development.

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  • 21-February-2014

    English

    Going for Growth 2014: China

    China has shown strong resilience during the crisis, maintaining overall high growth rates, even though the pace has been decelerating since 2011.

  • 10-February-2014

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLIs)

    Source: OECD Main Economic Indicators (updated continuously) - Composite leading indicators (CLIs) are calculated for 29 OECD countries (Iceland is not included), 6 non-member economies and 9 zone aggregates. A country CLI comprises a set of component series selected from a wide range of key short-term economic indicators mainly covered in the MEI database.

  • 15-November-2013

    English

    China’s march to prosperity: reforms to avoid the middle-income trap

    China is well-placed to avoid the so-called "middle-income trap" and to continue to converge towards the more advanced economies, even though growth is likely to slow from near double-digit rates in the first decade of this millennium to around 7% at the 2020 horizon.

  • 16-October-2013

    English

    Policies for inclusive urbanisation in China

    Urbanisation in China has long been held back by various restrictions on land and internal migration but has taken off since the 1990s, as these impediments started to be gradually relaxed. People have moved in large numbers to richer cities, where productivity is higher and has increased further thanks to agglomeration effects.

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