Labour markets, human capital and inequality

Focus

  • Economic Survey of Argentina 2017

    Following years of unsustainable economic policies, Argentina has undertaken ambitious reforms. Further wide-ranging structural reforms are needed to respond to challenges still lying ahead. Protecting the poor and ensuring that growth is inclusive and sustainable are key priorities.

    Read more
  • Economic Survey of Luxembourg 2017

    Luxembourg is an advanced economy with the highest per capita income in the OECD, reflecting the dynamic services sector, notably in banking and other financial services.

    Read more
  • Economic Survey of Austria 2017

    Austria’s transition to a digital economy and society is progressing but is slower than in the most advanced economies. A whole-of-government approach should help embrace change and facilitate the flourishing of innovative businesses, work practices and lifestyles throughout Austria.

    Read more
 

Enhancing Economic Flexibility: What Is in It for Workers?

Reforms that boost growth by enhancing economic flexibility often meet strong opposition related to concerns that they may imply adverse consequences for categories of workers. This study investigates how making product or labour market regulation more flexible changes workers’ risks of moving out of employment and jobless people’s chances of becoming employed.

 

BlogPost: What do pro-competitive policies IMPLY for workers?

Less income inequality and more growth - Are they compatible?

Can both less income inequality and more growth be achieved? A recent OECD study sheds new light on the link between policies that boost growth and the distribution of income. It suggests that there are win-win policy options: raising human capital is key, various labour market reforms can help and taxation can be made more equitable and growth friendly. But there are also reforms that lead to a trade-off between growth and equity.