By Date


  • 28-September-2018

    English

    Indigenous Employment and Skills Strategies in Canada

    This report looks at a range of key labour market, economic and social indicators related to Canada’s growing Indigenous population, which comprises First Nations, Inuit and Métis. In 2016, there were over 1.6 million Indigenous People in Canada, accounting for 4.9% of the total population, which is a significant increase from 3.8% in 2006. The report looks at the implementation of the federal government’s Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Strategy through in-depth analysis across four case study areas, including 1) the Centre for Aboriginal Human Resources and Development in Winnipeg, Manitoba; 2) Community Futures Treaty Seven in Calgary, Alberta; 3) MAWIW Council in Fredericton, New Brunswick; and 4) Kiikenomaga Kikenjigewen Employment and Training Services (KKETS) in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The report highlights critical success factors to better link Indigenous People to high quality jobs while also providing recommendations regarding future labour market and skills programming for Indigenous People in Canada.
  • 29-June-2018

    English

    Energy Subsidy Reform Schemes in the Republic of Moldova - Assessing Energy Affordability and Environmental Impacts

    This report looks at the fiscal, environmental and social impacts of energy subsidy reform in Moldova with a particular focus on energy affordability. Reduced value added tax (VAT) rate on natural gas consumption and a VAT exemption on electricity and heat consumption by domestic users represent the largest fossil-fuel consumer subsidies in Moldova. Reforming these will imply an increase of the VAT rate, which will lead to an increase of gas, electricity and heat tariffs for households, and will in turn affect household consumption levels, related expenditures and energy affordability. If reform measures are to work, they will need to be accompanied by a carefully-designed social policy to protect poor households.
  • 28-June-2018

    English

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus

    Historically low productivity gains and record high inequality are major challenges for policy makers around the world. Both concerns have been exacerbated by the global financial crisis but took roots well before and reflect fundamental challenges with the way our economies function.
     
    This report proposes a new comprehensive approach to promote better productivity performance and reduce inequalities. It not only gathers the most recent empirical evidence on the main factors behind slowing productivity gains and rising or persisting inequalities but also suggests possible common foundations and linkages between these two trends. It stresses the risk of a vicious cycle setting in, where individuals with fewer skills and poorer access to opportunities are confined to unproductive and often precarious jobs. This reduces aggregate productivity and widens inequality. The report focuses on how to expand the productive assets of an economy by investing in the skills of its people and providing an environment where all firms have a fair chance to succeed, including in lagging regions. It draws preliminary conclusions on the type of policy packages that are needed and on their implications for policy making. It also sets an agenda for future research to deepen empirical evidence and make concrete country-specific policy recommendations.
  • 28-May-2018

    English

    Catching Up? Country Studies on Intergenerational Mobility and Children of Immigrants

    Previous OECD and EU work has shown that even native-born children with immigrant parents face persistent disadvantage in the education system, the school-to-work transition and the labour market. To which degree are these linked with their immigration background, i.e. with the issues faced by their parents? Complementing the report Catching Up? Intergenerational Mobility and Children of Immigrants (OECD 2017), this publication presents seven in-depth country case studies. The countries and regions covered in this publication are Austria, the European Union, France, Germany, the Netherlands, North America and Sweden.
  • 28-May-2018

    English

    OECD Week

    OECD Week 2018 will take place at OECD Paris Headquarters from 28 May to 1 June, including the OECD Forum, the OECD Ministerial Council Meeting (MCM), BIAC and TUAC's annual General Assemblies, together with a G20/OECD trade conference, a B20 seminar, an informal Ministerial of Trade Ministers, and the International Economic Forum on Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Related Documents
  • 15-May-2018

    English

    OECD Social Policy Ministerial Meeting: Social Policy for Shared Prosperity: Embracing the Future

    Let me begin by thanking Minister Duclos for chairing this meeting and our co-vice chairs ─ Minister Achtsioglou (Greece), Minister Vieira da Silva (Portugal) and Minister Strandhall (Sweden) ─ who will lead this afternoon’s break-out sessions.

    Related Documents
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Launch of the report “Is the Last Mile the Longest?” Nordic Gender Effect at work - OECD Social Policy Ministerial Meeting

    I am delighted to present the report “Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries” and would like to commend the Nordic Council of Ministers for this important initiative.

    Related Documents
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.
    This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.
    The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure.
     
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    2018 OECD Social Policy Forum and Ministerial Meeting

    On May 15th 2018, Ministers responsible for Social Policy in over 35 OECD and partner countries will meet in Montréal to exchange their views on their countries’ challenges, opportunities, and best practices in social protection in a Ministerial meeting entitled Social Policy for Shared Prosperity: Embracing the Future.

    Related Documents
  • 14-May-2018

    English, PDF, 259kb

    The Future of Social Protection: What works for non-standard workers?

    Rapid and deep technological changes driven by the digital revolution, together with globalisation and demographic changes, are creating many new job opportunities but also new challenges. In particular, these transformations are contributing to the rise in non-standard forms of employment – self-employment, temporary work, and ‘independent contracting’.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>