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Namibia


  • 2-December-2021

    English

    Jobs for Rural Youth - The Role of Local Food Economies

    Today, the global youth population is at its highest ever and still growing, with the highest proportion of youth living in Africa and Asia, and a majority of them in rural areas. Young people in rural areas face the double challenge of age-specific vulnerabilities and underdevelopment of rural areas. While agriculture absorbs the majority of rural workers in developing countries, low pay and poor working conditions make it difficult to sustain rural livelihoods. Potential job opportunities for rural youth exist in agriculture and along the agri-food value chain, however. Growing populations, urbanisation and rising incomes of the working class are increasing demand for more diverse and higher value added agricultural and food products in Africa and developing Asia. This demand will create a need for off-farm labour, especially in agribusinesses, which tends to be better paid and located in rural areas and secondary towns. It could boost job creation in the food economy provided that local food systems were mobilised to take up the challenge of higher and changing domestic demand for food.
  • 4-October-2021

    English

    Education-occupation mismatch in the context of informality and development

    Using household data from 15 countries in Latin America and Africa, this paper explores linkages between informality and education-occupation matching. The paper applies a unified methodology to measuring education-occupation mismatches and informality, consistently with the international labour and statistical standards in this area. The results suggest that in the majority of low- and middle-income developing countries with available data, workers in informal jobs have higher odds of being undereducated as compared to workers in formal jobs. Workers in formal jobs, in contrast, have higher chances of being overeducated. These results are consistent for dependent as well as for independent workers. They also hold for men and for women according to the gender-disaggregated analysis. Moreover, in the majority of countries considered in this paper, the matching-informality nexus is also related to the extent of informality in a given area: in labour markets with higher informality, informal workers in particular have a higher chance of being undereducated. The paper discusses policy implications of these findings.
  • 30-September-2021

    English

    Andorra, Namibia and Spain take further steps to strengthen their tax treaties

    Today, Namibia signed the Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (the Convention or MLI), becoming the 96th jurisdiction to join the Convention. Earlier this week, Andorra and Spain deposited their instruments of ratification for the Convention thus underlining their strong commitment to prevent the abuse of tax treaties and BEPS by MNEs.

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  • 8-June-2021

    English

    Building Agricultural Resilience to Natural Hazard-induced Disasters - Insights from Country Case Studies

    Natural hazard-induced disasters (NHID), such as floods, droughts, severe storms, and animal pests and diseases have significant, widespread and long-lasting impacts on agricultural sectors around the world. With climate change set to amplify many of these impacts, a 'business-as-usual' approach to disaster risk management in agriculture cannot continue if we are to meet the challenges of agricultural productivity and sustainability growth, and sustainable development. Drawing from seven case studies – Chile, Italy, Japan, Namibia, New Zealand, Turkey and the United States – this joint OECD-FAO report argues for a new approach to building resilience to NHID in agriculture. It explores the policy measures, governance arrangements, on-farm strategies and other initiatives that countries are using to increase agricultural resilience to NHID, highlighting emerging good practices. It offers concrete recommendations on what more needs to be done to shift from coping with the impacts of disasters, to an ex ante approach that focuses on preventing and mitigating the impacts of disasters, helping the sector be better prepared to respond to disasters, and to adapt and transform in order to be better positioned for future disasters.
  • 26-May-2021

    English

    Financing the extension of social insurance to informal economy workers - The role of remittances

    Informal employment, defined through the lack of employment-based social protection, constitutes the bulk of employment in developing countries, and entails a level of vulnerability to poverty and other risks that are borne by all who are dependent on informal work income. Results from the Key Indicators of Informality based on Individuals and their Households database (KIIbIH) show that a disproportionately large number of middle‑class informal economy workers receive remittances. Such results confirm that risk management strategies, such as migration, play a part in minimising the potential risks of informal work for middle‑class informal households who may not be eligible to social assistance. They further suggest that middle‑class informal workers may have a solvent demand for social insurance so that, if informality-robust social insurance schemes were made available to them, remittances could potentially be channelled to finance the extension of social insurance to the informal economy.
  • 17-March-2021

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 12-February-2021

    English, PDF, 398kb

    Revenue Statistics Africa: Key findings for Namibia

    The tax-to-GDP ratio in Namibia decreased by 0.9 percentage points from 20.3% in 2017 to 19.4% in 2018. In comparison, the average for the 30 African countries increased by just under 0.1 percentage points over the same period, and was 16.5% in 2018.

  • 9-August-2019

    English

    Namibia joins the Inclusive Framework on BEPS

    The Inclusive Framework on BEPS welcomes Namibia bringing to 134 the total number of countries and jurisdictions participating on an equal footing in the Project.

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  • 19-April-2019

    English, PDF, 1,621kb

    Financing Social Protection in Namibia

    This paper charts the evolution of social protection provision and expenditure, locates social protection within the context of Namibia’s broader fiscal framework and proposes options for enhancing its impact without increasing public spending.

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  • 5-June-2017

    English

    Namibia establishes a roadmap for Social Protection System reform

    A seminar organised jointly by the Ministry of Poverty Eradication and Social Welfare, the EU-SPS and UNICEF was held in Windhoek from 31 May – 2 June.

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