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  • 7-July-2021

    English

    Iceland: increase competition and economic diversification to support the recovery from COVID-19, says OECD

    Rising exports are helping to restore economic growth in Iceland after the blow from the COVID-19 crisis, even though tourism is still recovering. Further diversifying the economy and pursuing structural reforms to boost productivity growth will be key to building a strong and sustainable recovery, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 19-May-2021

    English, PDF, 177kb

    Preventing Harmful Alcohol Use: Key Findings for Iceland

    Iceland consumes 9.1 litres of pure alcohol per capita per year, roughly equivalent to 1.9 bottles of wine or 3.5 litres of beer per week per person aged 15 and over. In addition, in Iceland, some population groups are at higher risk than others.

  • 28-April-2021

    English

    The Economic Benefits of Air Quality Improvements in Arctic Council Countries

    The Arctic is a vital region that helps preserve the balance of the global climate. The Arctic environment is particularly sensitive to short-lived climate pollutants, including black carbon, due to their strong warming effect. With ambitious policy action to reduce air pollutants, Arctic Council countries would obtain a positive effect on health and the environment throughout their territory, while also helping to slow down climate change by reducing emissions of black carbon. This report calls for ambitious policy action to reduce air pollution in Arctic Council countries, highlighting the environmental, health, and economic benefits from policy action.
  • 17-December-2020

    English

    Iceland should step up efforts to detect and enforce its foreign bribery offences

    Detection of foreign bribery, as well as awareness of related risks, are still lacking in Iceland. In spite of having been one of the original signatories to the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, Iceland has only recently commenced its first foreign bribery investigation. Detection of foreign bribery by the Icelandic authorities needs therefore to be significantly improved.

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  • 1-July-2020

    English

    Iceland: Ambassador, Permanent Representative to the OECD

    Biographical note of Iceland's Permanent Representative to the OECD.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,254kb

    How's life in Iceland?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 14-November-2019

    English

    Fit for the future: learning from the COVID-19 crisis to reinforce democratic governance, OECD Roundtable

    The roundtable will launch the OECD's Government at a Glance 2021, a flagship OECD report which provides a comprehensive set of rigorous, internationally comparable data on government resources, activities and results in OECD countries and beyond.

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  • 16-September-2019

    English

    Iceland’s slowdown underlines the need to fix structural issues

    Sound macroeconomic policies and favourable external conditions have enabled Iceland’s economy to emerge stronger from a decade of post-crisis management. Yet the impact on growth from a drop in tourist arrivals and seafood exports underlines the need for reforms to open up and diversify the economy and improve its resiliency to sectoral shocks, according to the latest OECD Economic Survey of Iceland.

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  • 13-September-2019

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Reykjavik on 15-16 September 2019

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Reykjavik on 15-16 September 2019 to present the 2019 OECD Economic Survey of Iceland, alongside Mr. Bjarni Benediktsson, Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs, and Ms. Lilja Alfredsdottir, Minister of Education, Science and Culture of Iceland.

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  • 4-December-2018

    English, PDF, 546kb

    Good jobs for all in a changing world of work: The new OECD Jobs Strategy – Key findings for Iceland

    The digital revolution, globalisation and demographic changes are transforming labour markets at a time when policy makers are also struggling with slow productivity and wage growth and high levels of income inequality. The new OECD Jobs Strategy provides a comprehensive framework and policy recommendations to help countries address these challenges.

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