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  • 17-June-2021

    English

    Fighting Tax Crime – The Ten Global Principles, Second Edition

    First published in 2017, Fighting Tax Crime - The Ten Global Principles is the first comprehensive guide to fighting tax crimes. It sets out ten essential principles covering the legal, institutional, administrative, and operational aspects necessary for developing an efficient and effective system for identifying, investigating and prosecuting tax crimes, while respecting the rights of accused taxpayers. This second edition addresses new challenges, such as tackling professionals who enable tax and white-collar crimes, and fostering international co-operation in the recovery of assets. Drawing on the experiences of jurisdictions in all continents, the report also highlights successful cases relating to the misuse of virtual assets, complex investigations involving joint task forces, and the use of new technology tools to fight tax crimes and other financial crimes. The Ten Global Principles are an essential element of the OECD’s Oslo Dialogue, a whole-of-government approach for fighting tax crimes and illicit financial flows. Alongside the policy document, the second edition is joined by 33 country chapters, detailing jurisdictions’ domestic tax crime enforcement frameworks as well as the progress made in implementing the Ten Global Principles. These chapters are available separately online.
  • 15-June-2021

    German, PDF, 309kb

    OECD Skills Outlook 2021: Wie steht Deutschland im Vergleich da?

    The Skills Outlook Country Profile details key indicators to assess the extent to which Germany is able to provide strong foundations for lifelong learning; promote effective transitions into further education, training and the labour market and engage adults in learning. It also evaluates the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on adult learning and the labour market.

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  • 15-June-2021

    English, PDF, 297kb

    OECD Skills Outlook 2021: How does Germany compare?

    The Skills Outlook Country Profile details key indicators to assess the extent to which Germany is able to provide strong foundations for lifelong learning; promote effective transitions into further education, training and the labour market and engage adults in learning. It also evaluates the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on adult learning and the labour market.

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  • 11-June-2021

    English

    Building the STRING megaregion as a green hub in the wake of COVID-19

    STRING is a political cross-border organisation spanning five cities (the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, Copenhagen, Malmö, Gothenburg and Oslo) and eight regions (Schleswig-Holstein, Region of Southern Denmark, Region Zealand, Capital Region of Denmark, Region Skåne, Region Halland, Västra Götalandsregionen and Viken County) across Germany, Denmark, Sweden and Norway. Home to around 14 million inhabitants, STRING has good potential to become a leading European megaregion and an internationally acknowledged Green Hub if governments 'think big' and work together beyond their own boundaries. Building on its green expertise and high levels of innovation and quality of life, STRING could take advantage of current opportunities such as the construction of the Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link to reap the benefits of agglomeration economies and establish itself as a sustainable megaregion. However, time is of the essence. Seizing the political momentum of the coming decade, including the momentum to support a green recovery from COVID-19, will be critical to advance STRING’s green vision and shape a future-proof economic model.
  • 9-June-2021

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Germany 2021

    The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts reviews of the individual development co operation efforts of its members every five to six years. DAC peer reviews critically examine the overall performance of a given member covering its policy, programmes and systems. They take an integrated, system wide perspective on the development co operation activities of the member under review and its approach to fragility, crisis and humanitarian assistance. This peer review shows that Germany invests in fair and sustainable globalisation and a rules-based multilateral order. It provided 0.73% of its national income as official development assistance in 2020. The country is adjusting its engagement with Africa and reforming the way it delivers development co-operation. Germany could be more systematic in analysing and addressing the spill-over effects of its policies on developing countries. German development co-operation would benefit from a clearer vision and greater investment in gender equality and leaving no one behind, and embedding a culture of results. Its clear vision and comprehensive approach to crises would benefit from better defining short and long-term engagements.
  • 4-June-2021

    English

    Boosting social entrepreneurship and social enterprise development in Brandenburg, Germany - In-depth policy review

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the policy ecosystem in place for social entrepreneurship and social enterprises in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It identifies the state’s key strengths and challenges and provides policy recommendations to support the development of a stronger policy ecosystem. It includes a conceptual framework for social entrepreneurship and social innovation (Chapter 2); with recommendations and analyses to build institutional and legal frameworks for social enterprises (Chapter 3), improve access to finance for social entrepreneurship development (Chapter 4), promote access to private and public markets for social entrepreneurship development (Chapter 5), and strengthen social impact measurement and reporting for social enterprise development (Chapter 6).
  • 19-May-2021

    English, PDF, 176kb

    Preventing Harmful Alcohol Use: Key Findings for Germany

    Germany has one of the highest levels of alcohol consumption – 12.9 litres of pure alcohol per capita per year, roughly equivalent to 2.6 bottles of wine or 5 litres of beer per week per person aged 15 and over. In addition, in Germany, some population groups are at higher risk than others.

  • 19-May-2021

    English, PDF, 222kb

    Schädlichen Alkoholkonsum verhindern - Deutschland

    Deutschland verzeichnet eines der höchsten Level von Alkoholkonsum – 12.9 Liter reinen Alkohol pro Kopf und Jahr. Dies entspricht ungefähr 2,6 Flaschen Wein oder 5 Liter Bier pro Woche pro Person über 15 Jahren. Zudem sind in Deutschland einige Bevölkerungsgruppen einem höheren Risiko ausgesetzt.

  • 23-April-2021

    English

    Germany needs a more coherent continuing education and training system that better addresses the needs of the low-skilled

    Germany should pay more attention to the needs of the low-skilled in continuing education and training (CET), and make the CET system more coherent overall, according to a new OECD report, Continuing Education and Training in Germany.

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  • 23-April-2021

    English

    Continuing Education and Training in Germany

    Germany has a strong skill development system. The country’s 15‑year‑old students performed above the OECD average in the last (2018) edition of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), continuing a trend of significant improvement since PISA’s first edition in 2000. Its adult population also has above‑average literacy and numeracy skills, according to the OECD Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC). A strong and well-respected vocational education and training system is seen as one of the success factors behind these achievements. However, participation in learning beyond initial education lags behind other high-performing OECD countries and varies considerably across different groups of the population. This is problematic in a rapidly changing labour market, where participation in continuing education and training is a precondition for individuals, enterprises and economies to harness the benefits of these changes. This report assesses the current state of the German continuing education and training (CET) system. It examines how effectively and efficiently the system prepares people and enterprises for the changes occurring in the world of work, and identifies what changes are necessary to make the CET system more future ready. The report makes recommendations for the further development of the CET system based on international good practice.
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