Reports


  • 16-June-2016

    English

    Promoting Green and Inclusive Growth in Canada

    Canadians enjoy a high level of well-being. On all eleven components of the OECD’s Better Life Index, Canada performs better than the OECD average. The economy and labour markets stood up better than those of most OECD countries to the ravages of the global financial crisis. Still, there are some areas where the country can do even better. Canada needs to improve its productivity performance, building on the recent increased growth in labour productivity to narrow the gap with top-performing OECD countries in terms of the level of productivity. The productivity gap with the United States is particularly large for small and medium-sized enterprises. Productivity growth could also be more inclusive. People from socially disadvantaged backgrounds and Indigenous communities currently do not participate to the extent that they should in the country’s strong economic performance. Finally, Canada needs to make growth greener, in order to contribute its fair share to the global fight against climate change.

  • 13-June-2016

    English

    Economic Survey of Canada 2016

    The Canadian economy is adjusting to the fall in the terms of trade. The main challenges are to reduce financial stability risks, boost productivity growth and make growth greener and more inclusive.

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  • 31-May-2016

    English, PDF, 1,180kb

    How's life in Canada?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2016.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Taxing Wages: Canada

    The tax burden on labour income is expressed by the tax wedge, which is a measure of the net tax burden on labour income borne by the employee and the employer.

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  • 12-April-2016

    English, PDF, 175kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Canada

    Canada has the 10th lowest tax wedge among the 34 OECD member countries. The country occupied the same position in 2014. The average single worker in Canada faced a tax wedge of 31.6% in 2015 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%.

  • 1-April-2016

    English

    National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts 2015

    The 2015 edition of National Accounts of OECD Countries, General Government Accounts is an annual publication, dedicated to government finance which is based on the System of National Accounts 2008 (SNA 2008) for all countries except Chile, Japan, Korea and Turkey (SNA 1993). It includes tables showing government aggregates and balances for the production, income and financial accounts as well as detailed tax and social contribution receipts and a breakdown of expenditure of general government by function, according to the harmonised international classification, COFOG. These detailed accounts are available for the general government sector. Data also cover the following sub-sectors, according to availability: central government, state government, local government and social security funds.

    The data in this publication are also available on line via www.oecd-ilibrary.org under the title OECD National Accounts Statistics, General Government Accounts (http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga-data-en and http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/na-gga08-data-en).

  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 432kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Canada

    To become a doctor in Canada, a student can therefore expect 9 to 13 years of university education and post-graduate training, depending on the area of specialisation.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 315kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Canada

    In Canada, there are three main categories for nurses: Licenced Practice Nurses (LPNs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPNs). In addition, registered nurses can pursue further education to become Clinical Nurse Specialists and/or Nurse Practitioners.

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  • 7-March-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Canada 2015

    Canada has continued to harvest its vast natural resources and witnessed a shale revolution alongside rising oil sands production and investment in the energy sector over the past five years. The medium-term outlook for gas/oil production and exports, however, is challenging amid uncertainties around pipeline developments and an era of low prices, abundant global supplies and surging production in the United States, Canada’s main export market.

    Canada maintains the highest energy supply per capita among IEA member countries. Emissions from the oil and gas sectors increased by 14% in 2005-13, despite Canada’s low-carbon electricity mix (largely hydro and nuclear). The federal government, with the provinces, has put forward stringent energy efficiency and emission standards in the buildings, power and transport sectors, but not in industry. To strengthen its position as responsible energy supplier and user, Canada must take action to mitigate emissions and energy intensity. It can continue to develop its resources in a sustainable and cost-effective manner while balancing its economic and sustainability goals.

    Canada remains at the forefront of technological and regulatory innovation in unconventional oil and gas production and carbon capture and storage (CCS) with four large-scale CCS projects under way in 2015. The country has adopted ambitious climate targets at provincial and federal levels, but the federation is far from meeting its targets for 2020 and 2030. In July 2015, the Premiers of the provinces and territories agreed a Canadian Energy Strategy. The IEA urges the federal government to seize this opportunity for collective action to meet its 2030 goals and bring certainty to investment in clean-energy technologies and renewables.

    This in-depth review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Canada and provides recommendations for each energy sector, including advice for the implementation of the Canadian Energy Strategy.

  • 4-February-2016

    English

    Canada - Financing Democracy: Funding of Political Parties and Election Campaigns and the Risk of Policy Capture

    This case study reviews the Canadian Elections Act, the primary legal framework for funding and oversight of political parties, candidates and campaigns. It also discusses role, mandate and practices of the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada, and the challenges presented going forward.

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