Publications

Interconnected Economies

Benefiting from Global Value Chains

Published on May 28, 2013

Also available in: French, Chinese

book

Global Value Chains (GVCs) have exploded in the past decade and refer to the international dispersion of design, production, assembly, marketing and distribution of services, activities, and products. Different stages in the production process are increasingly located across different economies, and intermediate inputs like parts and components are produced in one country and then exported to other countries for further production and/or assembly into final products. The functional and spatial fragmentation that has occurred within GVCs has significantly reshaped the global economic landscape, thereby raising some new major policy challenges for OECD countries and emerging countries alike: trade policy, competitiveness, upgrading and innovation and the management of global systemic risk.

SUMMARIESavailable in 24 languages

English Interconnected Economies (Summary in English)
Spanish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Spanish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Spanish)
German Interconnected Economies (Summary in German) Interconnected Economies (Summary in German)
Japanese Interconnected Economies (Summary in Japanese) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Japanese)
Italian Interconnected Economies (Summary in Italian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Italian)
Chinese Interconnected Economies (Summary in Chinese) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Chinese)
Czech Interconnected Economies (Summary in Czech) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Czech)
Danish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Danish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Danish)
Dutch Interconnected Economies (Summary in Dutch) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Dutch)
Estonian Interconnected Economies (Summary in Estonian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Estonian)
Finnish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Finnish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Finnish)
Greek Interconnected Economies (Summary in Greek) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Greek)
Hebrew Interconnected Economies (Summary in Hebrew) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Hebrew)
Hungarian Interconnected Economies (Summary in Hungarian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Hungarian)
Icelandic Interconnected Economies (Summary in Icelandic) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Icelandic)
Korean Interconnected Economies (Summary in Korean) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Korean)
Norwegian Interconnected Economies (Summary in Norwegian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Norwegian)
Polish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Polish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Polish)
Portuguese Interconnected Economies (Summary in Portuguese) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Portuguese)
Russian Interconnected Economies (Summary in Russian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Russian)
Slovak Interconnected Economies (Summary in Slovak) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Slovak)
Slovene Interconnected Economies (Summary in Slovenian) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Slovenian)
Swedish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Swedish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Swedish)
Turkish Interconnected Economies (Summary in Turkish) Interconnected Economies (Summary in Turkish)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword
Executive summary
The rise of global value chains
Measuring trade in value added
Implications of global value chains for trade policy
Global value chains and international investment
The role of global value chains in economic development
Global value chains and competitiveness
Upgrading in global value chains
Global value chains
Powered by OECD iLibrary