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Peru


  • 28-October-2021

    English

    How’s Life in Latin America? - Measuring Well-being for Policy Making

    Many Latin American countries have experienced improvements in income over recent decades, with several of them now classified as high-income or upper middle-income in terms of conventional metrics. But has this change been mirrored in improvements across the different areas of people’s lives? How’s Life in Latin America? Measuring Well-being for Policy Making addresses this question by presenting comparative evidence for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) with a focus on 11 LAC countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay). Spanning material conditions, quality of life, resources for future well-being, and inequalities, the report presents available evidence on well-being both before and since the onset of the pandemic, based on the OECD Well-being Framework. It also identifies priorities for addressing well-being gaps and describes how well-being frameworks are used in policy within Latin America and elsewhere around the world, providing lessons for governments on what is needed to put people’s well-being at the centre of their action. The report is part of the EU Regional Facility for Development in Transition for Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • 12-October-2021

    English

    OECD Regional Centre for Competition in Latin America Newsletter

    Published twice a year, this newsletter reports on the activities of the OECD Regional Centre for Competition in Latin America. It shares regional experiences and recent developments from the economies in the Latin American and Caribbean region.

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  • 4-October-2021

    English

    Education-occupation mismatch in the context of informality and development

    Using household data from 15 countries in Latin America and Africa, this paper explores linkages between informality and education-occupation matching. The paper applies a unified methodology to measuring education-occupation mismatches and informality, consistently with the international labour and statistical standards in this area. The results suggest that in the majority of low- and middle-income developing countries with available data, workers in informal jobs have higher odds of being undereducated as compared to workers in formal jobs. Workers in formal jobs, in contrast, have higher chances of being overeducated. These results are consistent for dependent as well as for independent workers. They also hold for men and for women according to the gender-disaggregated analysis. Moreover, in the majority of countries considered in this paper, the matching-informality nexus is also related to the extent of informality in a given area: in labour markets with higher informality, informal workers in particular have a higher chance of being undereducated. The paper discusses policy implications of these findings.
  • 14-July-2021

    English

    Implementing Regulatory Impact Assessment at Peru’s National Superintendence of Sanitation Services

    Regulations play a fundamental role in achieving public policy objectives, including the protection of human health and the environment, the fight against monopolies, or the efficient provision of water and sanitation services. Regulatory impact assessment (RIA) is an important tool for ensuring that regulations are of good quality. This report provides guidance for implementing RIA at the National Superintendence of Sanitation Services in Peru (Sunass). After assessing the agency’s process for issuing rules, the report provides recommendations for designing legal reforms needed to establish RIA as a permanent practice as well as training for the staff who will develop the RIAs. The report includes technical guidelines on undertaking public consultation, identifying public policy problems, and performing cost-benefit analysis.
  • 9-July-2021

    English

    Aligning development co-operation to the SDGs in upper-middle income countries - A case study of Peru

    Achieving sustainable development will require all development actors to act together and in synergy, and using comparable metrics to monitor progress. This case study explores whether the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can be used as a shared framework by all actors to manage development co-operation for results in upper middle-income countries, taking Peru as a case study. The report first lays out Peru’s SDG journey: its vision of the Goals as an anchor for policy coherence, and how its domestic policies align with them. It then discusses how well development co-operation aligns to the SDGs in Peru, analysing the related enablers, drivers and challenges. The report also examines how to set up monitoring approaches that support SDG measurement in Peru. Finally, it suggests ways to overcome a number of technical, political and organisational challenges that limit the use of the SDGs – some of which are unique to development co-operation delivery in upper middle-income countries.
  • 30-June-2021

    English

    Peru has strengthened domestic corruption enforcement, now must maintain momentum and increase foreign bribery awareness and enforcement

    Peru has strengthened domestic corruption enforcement, now must maintain momentum and increase foreign bribery awareness and enforcement

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  • 30-June-2021

    English

    Peru has strengthened domestic corruption enforcement, now must maintain momentum and increase foreign bribery awareness and enforcement

    Peru has recently improved its efforts to fight domestic corruption. It must now sustain these efforts, extend them to fighting foreign bribery, and raise awareness of this crime, according to a new report by the OECD Working Group on Bribery.

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  • 18-June-2021

    English

    Integrity in the Peruvian Regions - Implementing the Integrity System

    Promoting integrity in subnational government can be a challenge, but it is crucial. Indeed, it is often at this level where trust in government is forged, and where actions to promote integrity have the greatest impact. This report looks at efforts in Peru to introduce an integrity function at regional government level. It analyses how regions are implementing this function and proposes concrete recommendations for improvement. The report also looks at how to improve the impact of Regional Anticorruption Commissions and how national actors, in particular the Peruvian Secretary of Public Integrity, can provide support to the integrity function and system at the regional level.
  • 11-June-2021

    English

    Peru - OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

    This page contains all information relating to implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in Peru.

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  • 26-May-2021

    English

    Financing the extension of social insurance to informal economy workers - The role of remittances

    Informal employment, defined through the lack of employment-based social protection, constitutes the bulk of employment in developing countries, and entails a level of vulnerability to poverty and other risks that are borne by all who are dependent on informal work income. Results from the Key Indicators of Informality based on Individuals and their Households database (KIIbIH) show that a disproportionately large number of middle‑class informal economy workers receive remittances. Such results confirm that risk management strategies, such as migration, play a part in minimising the potential risks of informal work for middle‑class informal households who may not be eligible to social assistance. They further suggest that middle‑class informal workers may have a solvent demand for social insurance so that, if informality-robust social insurance schemes were made available to them, remittances could potentially be channelled to finance the extension of social insurance to the informal economy.
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