Share

El Salvador


  • 26-May-2021

    English

    Financing the extension of social insurance to informal economy workers - The role of remittances

    Informal employment, defined through the lack of employment-based social protection, constitutes the bulk of employment in developing countries, and entails a level of vulnerability to poverty and other risks that are borne by all who are dependent on informal work income. Results from the Key Indicators of Informality based on Individuals and their Households database (KIIbIH) show that a disproportionately large number of middle‑class informal economy workers receive remittances. Such results confirm that risk management strategies, such as migration, play a part in minimising the potential risks of informal work for middle‑class informal households who may not be eligible to social assistance. They further suggest that middle‑class informal workers may have a solvent demand for social insurance so that, if informality-robust social insurance schemes were made available to them, remittances could potentially be channelled to finance the extension of social insurance to the informal economy.
  • 22-April-2021

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Latin America and the Caribbean 2021

    This report compiles comparable tax revenue statistics over the period 1990-2019 for 27 Latin American and Caribbean economies. Based on the OECD Revenue Statistics database, it applies the OECD methodology to countries in Latin America and the Caribbean to enable comparison of tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among the economies of the region and with other economies. This publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration, the OECD Development Centre, the Inter-American Center of Tax Administrations (CIAT), the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The 2021 edition is produced with the support of the EU Regional Facility for Development in Transition for Latin America and the Caribbean, which results from joint work led by the European Union, the OECD and its Development Centre, and ECLAC.
  • 17-March-2021

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

    Related Documents
  • 5-November-2020

    English

    El Salvador - Competition Law and Policy

    This page contains information on the work of the OECD and El Salvador in the area of Competition Law and Policy.

    Related Documents
  • 5-November-2020

    English

    Exámenes Inter-pares de la OCDE y el BID sobre el Derecho y Política de Competencia: El Salvador

    Este Examen interpares descubrió que en El Salvador los pilares básicos de la Ley de Competencia están en consonancia con las prácticas óptimas internacionales y las propuestas de reforma más recientes muestran los esfuerzos de El Salvador para incrementar la eficacia de esta legislación.

    Related Documents
  • 5-November-2020

    English

    OECD-IDB Peer Reviews of Competition Law and Policy: El Salvador

    Peer review is a core element of OECD work. El Salvador’s competition law and policy was peer reviewed in 2019. Access and read more about this review.

    Related Documents
  • 9-October-2020

    English

    International Summer School for community and local development in Latin America and the Caribbean

    The School organises specialised courses on socio-economic development and creates an international platform to exchange experiences and knowledge between public officers and practitioners from Latin America and the Caribbean that deals with cooperation and local development issues.

    Related Documents
  • 28-September-2020

    English

    Using Google data to understand governments’ approval in Latin America

    This paper studies the potential drivers of governments’ approval rates in 18 Latin American countries using Internet search query data from Google Trends and traditional data sources. It employs monthly panel data between January 2006 and December 2015. The analysis tests several specifications including traditional explanatory variables of governments’ approval rates – i.e. inflation, unemployment rate, GDP growth, output gap – and subjective explanatory variables – e.g. perception of corruption and insecurity. For the latter, it uses Internet search query data to proxy citizens’ main social concerns, which are expected to drive governments’ approval rates. The results show that the perception of corruption and insecurity, and complaints about public services have a statistically significant association with governments’ approval rates. This paper also discusses the potential of Internet search query data as a tool for policy makers to understand better citizens’ perceptions, since it provides highly anonymous and high-frequency series in real-time.
  • 11-August-2020

    English

    Competition Law and Policy in Latin America

    Access reviews on competition law and policy in Latin American countries conducted by the IDB and the OECD. Countries covered are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Panama and Peru.

    Related Documents
  • 11-August-2020

    English

    OECD Regional Centre for Competition in Latin America in Lima

    The OECD Regional Centre for Competition in Latin America is a joint venture between the Peruvian Competition Authority and the OECD. Launched in November 2019, the Centre expands the OECD's work on competition in Latin America. See more about the centre.

    Related Documents
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>