Partager

Publications & Documents


  • 12-janvier-2021

    Français

    Principes directeurs pour des contrats extractifs durables

    Les Principes directeurs pour des contrats extractifs durables indiquent comment développer des projets extractifs reflétant l'équilibre des risques et bénéfices, tout en tenant compte dès le départ des intérêts et des préoccupations des communautés locales. Ils apportent un cadre au contenu et à la négociation des contrats extractifs, permettant de réduire les risques de litiges et les demandes de renégociation, et de s’adapter de manière prévisible aux conditions qui prévalent sur les marchés. Les Principes directeurs donnent aux gouvernements des pays hôtes et aux investisseurs les clés pour expliquer au public le contenu des contrats, et ainsi gérer les tensions entre les parties prenantes. Ils incluent huit principes et des commentaires que gouvernements hôtes, investisseurs, fournisseurs d’assistance technique et praticiens du droit peuvent utiliser comme référence commune pour la future négociation de contrats pérennes et mutuellement avantageux.
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 8-January-2021

    English

    Mobilising institutional investor capital for climate-aligned development

    Financing from institutional investors will be critical to achieving the sustainable development goals and curbing climate change. However, these large investors have been largely absent from multilateral initiatives to mobilise private capital. Partly as a result, such initiatives have been unable to reach the scale required for development finance to go 'from billions to trillions'. Successful mobilisation of private capital – including from institutional investors – has instead frequently taken place at the local level, by strategic investment funds and some green banks. At the same time, some institutional investors have been changing their modus operandi, from an intermediary to a collaborative model, and are re-localising their operations. The elimination of financial intermediaries with a short-term focus removes a bottleneck between two categories of long-term investors – institutional investors and multilateral finance institutions. That opens new opportunities for collaboration, as discussed in this paper.
  • 22-December-2020

    English

    Financing in fragile contexts

    The volume, quality, and political economy of financing – where, how and to whom resources flow – can impact significantly on socio-economic opportunities and incentives towards stability or conflict. Many fragile contexts have slowly been expanding their financing options and economic linkages. But these linkages can bring both opportunities and risks, as the COVID-19 pandemic makes starkly clear. This paper presents trends, lessons learned, and key data on financing in fragile contexts, including government revenues, private investment, remittances and private philanthropic giving. Drawing on the OECD multidimensional fragility framework, this paper offers insights into the state of financing in fragile contexts, its links to the dimensions and drivers of fragility, and current risks and opportunities. This paper is part of a broader OECD work-stream on Financing for Stability and is one of ten working papers contributing to States of Fragility 2020.
  • 22-December-2020

    English

    Policy Framework on Sound Public Governance - Baseline Features of Governments that Work Well

    The interconnected challenges of our times call for a coherent and multidimensional approach to public governance. The OECD Policy Framework on Sound Public Governance provides governments at all levels with an integrated diagnostic, guidance and benchmarking tool that aims to improve the quality of public governance – an objective that takes on immediate strategic importance for governments as they strive to manage the COVID-19 crisis and plan for a sustainable and inclusive recovery. The Framework builds on OECD legal instruments in the area, on lessons learned over the past decade through the OECD’s Public Governance Reviews (PGRs) and other country and sector-specific assessments. The first part shows the importance of key governance values and provides an overview of enablers of sound public governance that governments can adopt to pursue successful reforms. The second part presents an overview of management tools and policy instruments that can enhance the quality and impact of policy-making at the different stages of the policy cycle. Each chapter poses a number of strategic questions that policy-makers can use to self-assess the institutional and decision-making capacity of their governments in key public governance areas.
  • 22-December-2020

    English

    Local Public Finance and Capacity Building in Asia - Issues and Challenges

    Subnational governments’ capacity to effectively fund and deliver public services are crucial for the realisation of the benefits of decentralisation. However, subnational capacities often suffer from significant weaknesses, ranging from inadequate assignments of own-revenues, through to flaws in tax administration, the design of intergovernmental transfers, spending assignments and various aspects of public financial management. The volume discusses how better diagnostics and more strategic reforms can contribute to easing the resource constraints on subnational governments, as well as creating appropriate incentives for these governments to improve performance. The volume includes studies of the enabling conditions for subnational capacity building in Asia, as well as focused studies of China and India's fiscal relations challenges.
  • 18-décembre-2020

    Français

    Historique de la Liste des pays bénéficiaires de l’aide établie par le CAD

    Historique de la Liste établie par le CAD des bénéficiaires de l’aide (définition et anciennes listes)

    Documents connexes
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 18-December-2020

    English

    Indonesia’s perspective on Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD)

    This Working Paper presents the perspective of Indonesia on the concept of total official support for sustainable development (TOSSD), the extent of TOSSD resources provided by Indonesia and the capacity of the government to report on these resources. Indonesia broadly supported TOSSD as a relevant measure for monitoring SDG implementation and proposed some adjustments to the TOSSD methodology. Estimates for TOSSD provided by Indonesia in 2017 amount to USD 6 376 million, with USD 16 million for Pillar I (cross-border flows to other developing countries) and USD 6 360 million for Pillar II (contributions to international public goods). For Indonesia, activities recorded in TOSSD should not only be assessed in financial terms, but also in terms of their sustainable development impact. This pilot study attests to Indonesia’s strong capacity to report on TOSSD Pillar I, but finds that tracking could be improved for a wider range of resources. The country also has the capacity to report on Pillar II.
  • 18-December-2020

    English

    Towards more sustainable solutions to forced displacement - What measures are donor countries applying to forced displacement in developing countries?

    The majority of forcibly displaced people worldwide are hosted by developing countries. Alternative routes to sustainable solutions for the forcibly displaced, particularly in developing countries, are drying up, and the path towards and support for local integration and longer-term development is becoming urgent. Based on a questionnaire, this report delves into the question of how donor countries are addressing forced displacement and whether the shift towards a focus incorporating the humanitarian-development-peace nexus in addressing forced displacement is tangible. It highlights lessons learned so far and proposes recommendations on broadening the current approach to addressing forced displacement in developing economies.
  • 16-December-2020

    English

    Blended Finance in the Least Developed Countries 2020 - Supporting a Resilient COVID-19 Recovery

    The least developed countries (LDCs) are the furthest from achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They are also likely to be hit the hardest by the COVID-19 crisis and badly need the additional private finance that blended finance can unlock. Yet evidence shows that too little private finance is mobilised for investment in LDCs. How can this be fixed? The Blended Finance in the Least Developed Countries 2020 report is the third edition and second joint UNCDF-OECD report. It builds on UNCDF research and transactional experience, OECD data and analysis on private finance mobilized by official development finance, and a series consultations with and contributions by blended finance experts, LDC governments, UN missions, donors, civil society and research institutions. The report provides an update on the deployment of blended finance in LDCs. It also analyses its potential role in helping those countries recover from the COVID-19 crisis, and provides an Action Agenda for unlocking capital for the achievement of the SDGs in LDCs, as called for in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda.
  • 14-December-2020

    English

    Linking Indigenous Communities with Regional Development in Australia

    There are approximately 800,000 Indigenous Australians, which is 3.3% of Australia’s total population. Indigenous Australians are custodians of the world’s oldest living continuous culture and make a vital contribution to contemporary Australian society. Indigenous Australians are also important for the future of the national economy. For example, the amount of land with Indigenous ownership and interest has increased significantly in the last 50 years and now covers approximately half of Australia’s land mass. Indigenous Australians play an important role in the development of regional economies. Compared to the non-Indigenous population, Indigenous peoples are more likely to be located in predominantly rural regions. However, significant gaps in socio-economic outcomes with non-Indigenous Australians remain and these gaps are larger in rural regions. The report provides three key recommendations to improve economic outcomes for Indigenous Australians: improving the quality of the statistical framework and the inclusion of Indigenous peoples in the governance of data; promoting entrepreneurship to provide opportunities for Indigenous peoples to use assets and resources in ways that align with their objectives for development; and, implementing an approach to policies that is adapted to places, and empowers Indigenous institutions and communities.
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>