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Malaisie


  • 29-July-2019

    English

  • 24-July-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Malaysia 2019

    Malaysia’s economy is doing well, but social and governance challenges must be addressed. The new government prioritises inclusive growth and improving trust in public institutions. Further progress towards the planned target of high-income country status by 2024 will also require focusing on productivity growth with structural reforms to move up the value chain and improve skills. Ensuring environmental protection will improve the quality of growth.Growth is set to moderate in the near term, mainly due to slowing global trade. The rising cost of living has been a source of concern for large segments of the population. Progress could be made by providing a more targeted support, boosting entrepreneurship, improving productivity and employability among the low-income households.Fiscal policy needs reform. Building up fiscal space and ensuring medium-term sustainability will require increasing the low level of tax revenue. Improving budget process transparency and strengthening public debt management are key to fiscal accountability.Human capital development is needed to boost productivity and promote inclusive growth. Labour market imbalances hinder productivity and make it more difficult to climb up the value chain. Investment in education and training would help under-qualified workers. Policies to stimulate the demand for high-level skills would support those who are over-qualified.SPECIAL FEATURE: REDUCING SKILLS IMBALANCES TO FOSTER PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH
  • 19-July-2019

    English

    OECD Economic Survey of Malaysia launches on Wednesday 24 July 2019

    The latest OECD Economic Survey of Malaysia, to be released on Wednesday 24 July, analyses the factors underpinning the country’s successful economic performance, as well as the need for new policies to address social and governance challenges. The Survey discusses reforms to ensure fiscal sustainability, strengthen integrity, improve skills acquisition and social opportunities, raise productivity and make growth greener.

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  • 11-July-2019

    English, PDF, 351kb

    Revenue Statistics Asia: Key findings for Malaysia

    Malaysia's tax-to-GDP ratio was 14.3% in 2016, below the OECD average (34.0%) by 19.7 percentage points, and also below the LAC and Africa averages (22.7% and 18.2%, respectively).

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  • 26-February-2019

    English

    International investment in Southeast Asia

    ASEAN-OECD Investment Programme fosters dialogue and experience sharing between OECD members and ASEAN member states to enhance the investment climate in the region.

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  • 30-January-2019

    English, PDF, 201kb

    Services Trade Restrictiveness Index Country Note: Malaysia

    A two-page OECD summary and analysis of the Services Trade Restrictiveness Index results for Malaysia.

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  • 21-January-2019

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 10-December-2018

    English

    Building Resilient Cities - An Assessment of Disaster Risk Management Policies in Southeast Asia

    Asian cities are particularly vulnerable to risks associated with natural disasters. While they are exposed to various types of natural hazards, flooding and other water-related disasters pose particularly significant risks and undermine long-term economic growth, especially in coastal cities. Managing such natural disaster risks is an essential component of urban policies in fast-growing Southeast Asian cities, especially as the impacts of climate change worsen.In addition to providing a framework for assessing disaster risk management policies in cities, this report also presents the results of assessment and locally tailored policy recommendations in five cities of different institutional, geographic, socio-economic and environmental contexts in Southeast Asia. They include Bandung (Indonesia), Bangkok (Thailand), Cebu (Philippines), Hai Phong (Viet Nam) and Iskandar (Malaysia). The study highlights that Southeast Asian cities are largely underprepared for natural disaster risks.Through an assessment of disaster risk management (DRM) policies at national and subnational levels, the study aims to enhance urban resilience by: i) identifying policy challenges related to DRM ; ii) assessing the impacts of current DRM policy practices; and iii) proposing more efficient and effective policy options to enhance urban resilience.
  • 3-December-2018

    English

    OECD/Korea Policy Centre – Health and Social Policy Programmes

    The OECD/Korea Policy Centre fosters the exchange of technical information and policy experiences relating to the Asia Pacific region in areas such as health statistics, pension reforms and social policy and expenditure.

  • 1-September-2018

    English

    SME Policy Index: ASEAN 2018 - Boosting Competitiveness and Inclusive Growth

    The SME Policy Index is a benchmarking tool for emerging economies to monitor and evaluate progress in policies that support small and medium-sized enterprises. The ASEAN SME Policy Index 2018 is a joint effort between the Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East-Asia (ERIA), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the ASEAN Coordinating Committee on Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (ACCMSME). The report is the outcome of work conducted by the ten ASEAN Member States (Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam).Divided into eight policy dimensions, it builds on the previous edition of the ASEAN SME Policy Index 2014. The current edition presents an updated methodology which makes this document a powerful tool to assess the strengths and weaknesses that exist in policy design, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation for SMEs, and allows for a benchmarking of the level to which the ASEAN Strategic Action Plan for SME Development (SAP SMED) 2016-2025 has been implemented. Its objective is to enhance the capacity of policy makers to identify policy areas for future reform, as well as implement reforms in accordance with international good practices.The report provides a regional perspective on recent developments in SME-related policies in Southeast Asia as well as in individual ASEAN Member States.  Based on this analysis the report provides a menu of concrete policy options for the region and for the individual countries.
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