Latest Documents


  • 28-June-2017

    English

    LGBTI inclusiveness

    Despite a shift toward greater acceptance in most OECD countries, homo-, trans- and intersexphobia remain widespread, thereby putting LGBTI at risk of being discriminated against in dimensions critical for their well-being: family life, education, economic outcomes and health.

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  • 12-June-2017

    English, PDF, 476kb

    Workshop on the future of social protection - Agenda and presentations - Berlin, 12 June 2017

    This OECD practice-oriented workshop, organised jointly with the German Ministry of Social Affairs and ISSA, explored schemes providing social protection to the self-employed and those hovering between self- and dependent employment across the OECD and beyond.

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  • 6-June-2017

    English

    Understanding employment barriers to inform policy - Faces of joblessness

    The European Commission, the OECD and the World Bank are launching this new project to shed light on the barriers that individuals face in getting good-quality jobs.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Investing in Youth: Japan

    The present report on Japan is the seventh report in the Investing in Youth series. In three statistical chapters, the report provides an overview of the labour market situation of young people in Japan, presents a portrait of young people who are not in employment, education or training (the NEETs) and analyses the income situation of young people in Japan. Two policy chapters provide recommendations on how Japan can improve the school-to-work transition of disadvantaged young people, and on how employment, social and training programmes can help the NEETs find their way back into education or work.

    Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016).

  • 24-May-2017

    English, PDF, 3,380kb

    Policy Brief on the Future of Work: Basic Income as a Policy Option

    Recent debates of Basic Income proposals shine a useful spotlight on the challenges that traditional forms of income support are increasingly facing, and highlight gaps in social provisions that largely depend on income or employment status. Reforms towards more universal income support would need to be introduced in stages, requiring a parallel debate on how to finance a more equal sharing of the benefits of economic growth.

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  • 11-May-2017

    English

    A Decade of Social Protection Development in Selected Asian Countries

    Over the past ten years economic growth in Asia has contributed to a reduction of poverty as well as fertility rates, and greater prosperity has contributed to gains in life expectancy. However, at present many workers still work in informal employment, frequently for long hours at little pay and without social protection coverage. A growing demand for social support, extending the coverage of social protection benefits and improving the job quality of workers will be among Asia’s major challenges in future. This report considers these challenges, providing policy examples from countries to illustrate good practice, including Bangladesh, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Singapore and Viet Nam.

  • 11-April-2017

    English

    Taxing Wages 2017

    This annual flagship publication provides details of taxes paid on wages in OECD countries. It covers personal income taxes and social security contributions paid by employees, social security contributions and payroll taxes paid by employers, and cash benefits received by in-work families. It illustrates how these taxes and benefits are calculated in each member country and examines how they impact household incomes. The results also enable quantitative cross-country comparisons of labour cost levels and the overall tax and benefit position of single persons and families on different levels of earnings. The publication shows average and marginal effective tax rates on labour costs for eight different household types, which vary by income level and household composition (single persons, single parents, one or two earner couples with or without children). The average tax rates measure the part of gross wage earnings or labour costs taken in tax and social security contributions, both before and after cash benefits, and the marginal tax rates the part of a small increase of gross earnings or labour costs that is paid in these levies.

  • 30-March-2017

    English

    Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR)

    The OECD’s Social Benefit Recipients Database (SOCR) presents comparable information on the number of people receiving cash benefits. SOCR includes data for the main income replacement programmes in the unemployment, social assistance, disability and old-age branches. It currently covers six years (2007-2012) for most OECD and EU countries.

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  • 20-February-2017

    English, PDF, 159kb

    OECD, a leader in international measurement and analysis in social policy (2-page - .pdf)

    List of main projects, publications and datasets, by the OECD Social Policy divison: income inequality, family & children, gender, housing, youth, pensions, social indicators, social protection expenditure & recipients, tax & benefit systems, etc.

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  • 10-January-2017

    English

    Building an Inclusive Mexico - Policies and Good Governance for Gender Equality

    Mexico is slowly advancing on the path to gender equality. Many public policies aimed at empowering women are now in place: over the past two decades, Mexico has increased investments in girls' education, greatly expanded childcare and preschool, improved gender mainstreaming in government, and ensured that female politicians are well-represented at the ballot box. Yet, despite these efforts, many Mexican women still do not feel the effects of these policies at home, at work, or in public spaces. Large gender gaps remain in educational outcomes, participation in the labour market, pay, informality status, and hours of unpaid childcare and housework. “Unlocking Mexico’s full potential,” as Mexico's National Development Plan prescribes, will depend crucially on how well Mexico closes existing gender gaps in political, social and economic life and promotes real social change. Mexico must continue to invest in social and labour market policies that empower women, and reinvigorate efforts to reduce inequalities in education, labour force participation, job quality, unpaid work, and leadership. This will require embedding gender equality objectives in all public policies and budgets, across all levels of government, and ensuring the effective implementation, enforcement, and evaluation of policies and laws to achieve inclusive outcomes.

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