Latest Documents


  • 19-June-2018

    English

    Faces of Joblessness - Towards People-centred Employment Support

    The European Commission, the OECD and the World Bank launched this new project to shed light on the barriers that individuals face in getting good-quality jobs.

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  • 15-June-2018

    English

    A Broken Social Elevator? How to Promote Social Mobility

    This report provides new evidence on social mobility in the context of increased inequalities of income and opportunities in OECD and selected emerging economies. It covers the aspects of both social mobility between parents and children and of personal income mobility over the life course, and their drivers. The report shows that social mobility from parents to offspring is low across the different dimensions of earnings, education, occupation and health, and that the same prevails for personal income mobility over the life course. There is in particular a lack of mobility at the bottom and at the top of the social ladder – with 'sticky floors' preventing upward mobility for many and 'sticky ceilings' associated with opportunity hoarding at the top. The lack of social mobility has economic, societal and political consequences. This report shows that there is space for policies to make societies more mobile and protect households from adverse income shocks. It discusses the options and measures that policy makers can consider how to improve social mobility across and within generations.
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.
    This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.
    The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure.
     
  • 14-May-2018

    English

    2018 OECD Social Policy Forum and Ministerial Meeting

    On May 15th 2018, Ministers responsible for Social Policy in over 35 OECD and partner countries will meet in Montréal to exchange their views on their countries’ challenges, opportunities, and best practices in social protection in a Ministerial meeting entitled Social Policy for Shared Prosperity: Embracing the Future.

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  • 14-May-2018

    English, PDF, 260kb

    The Future of Social Protection: What works for non-standard workers?

    Rapid and deep technological changes driven by the digital revolution, together with globalisation and demographic changes, are creating many new job opportunities but also new challenges. In particular, these transformations are contributing to the rise in non-standard forms of employment – self-employment, temporary work, and ‘independent contracting’.

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  • 26-April-2018

    English

    Taxing Wages 2018

    This annual flagship publication provides details of taxes paid on wages in OECD countries. It covers personal income taxes and social security contributions paid by employees, social security contributions and payroll taxes paid by employers, and cash benefits received by in-work families. It illustrates how these taxes and benefits are calculated in each member country and examines how they impact household incomes. The results also enable quantitative cross-country comparisons of labour cost levels and the overall tax and benefit position of single persons and families on different levels of earnings. The publication shows average and marginal effective tax rates on labour costs for eight different household types, which vary by income level and household composition (single persons, single parents, one or two earner couples with or without children). The average tax rates measure the part of gross wage earnings or labour costs taken in tax and social security contributions, both before and after cash benefits, and the marginal tax rates the part of a small increase of gross earnings or labour costs that is paid in these levies.Taxing Wages 2018 includes a special feature entitled: 'Differences in the Disposable Incomes of Households with and without Children'.
  • 5-April-2018

    English

    Investing in Youth: Norway

    The present report on Norway is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth' which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017).
  • 1-March-2018

    English

    OECD Reviews of Labour Market and Social Policies: Lithuania

    Lithuania has undergone major economic and social change since the early 1990s. Despite an exceptionally deep recession following the global financial crisis, impressive economic growth over the past two decades has narrowed income and productivity gaps relative to comparable countries in the OECD. But Lithuania faces a massive demographic challenge, mostly as a result of large and persistent emigration driven primarily by low wages and poor working conditions. Income inequality is also very high, and households at the bottom of the income distribution have recently benefited very little from the recovery. Major reforms of the labour code, the unemployment insurance system, employment policies and pensions were recently undertaken within the New Social Model to improve labour maket adaptibility and income security. This report provides comprehensive analysis of Lithuania’s policies and practices compared with best practice in the field of labour, social and migration from the OECD countries. It contains several recommendations to tackle key challenges facing Lithuania. This report will be of interest in Lithuania as well as other countries looking to promote a more inclusive economy.
  • 9-February-2018

    English

    OECD/Korea Policy Centre – Health and Social Policy Programmes

    The OECD/Korea Policy Centre fosters the exchange of technical information and policy experiences relating to the Asia Pacific region in areas such as health statistics, pension reforms and social policy and expenditure.

  • 25-January-2018

    English

    High-Level Conference on Policies for Equal Ageing: A Life-Course Approach

    This High-Level Conference is organised by both the Government of Slovenia and the OECD in Brdo Congress Centre (Slovenia) on 25 and 26 January 2018.

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