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  • 14-November-2017

    English

    Register for the webinar - PISA 2015 Results (Volume V): Collaborative Problem Solving (Tuesday, 21 November,16:00 Paris time)

    The assessment examines students’ ability to work with two or more people to try to solve a problem. The report highlights how students’ gender, socio-economic status and immigrant background are related to their performance in the assessment and to their attitudes towards collaboration in general.

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  • 9-November-2017

    English

    Teaching in Focus No. 19: How do teachers become knowledgeable and confident in classroom management? Insights from a pilot study

    The Innovative Teaching for Effective Learning (ITEL) Teacher Knowledge Survey is the first international study to explore the nature, function and development of teachers’ pedagogical knowledge, i.e. what teachers know about teaching and learning.

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  • 9-November-2017

    English

    What matters for managing classrooms? (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Teaching is a demanding profession. Teachers are responsible for developing the skills and knowledge of their students, helping them overcome social and emotional hurdles and maintaining equitable, cohesive and productive classroom environments. On top of their teaching responsibilities, they are also expected to engage in continued professional development activities throughout their careers.

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  • 8-November-2017

    English

    India-OECD Global Symposium on Financial Education

    New Delhi, India, 8-9 November 2017. This symposium looked at how to implement effective financial education policies in a changing financial landscape with a focus on financial education in the digital age.

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  • 1-November-2017

    English

    Education and Skills Newsletter - October 2017

    What's new in education and skills at the OECD?

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    PISA in Focus No. 77: How does PISA measure students’ ability to collaborate?

    Solving unfamiliar problems on one’s own is important, but in today’s increasingly interconnected world, people are often required to collaborate in order to achieve their goals. Teamwork has numerous benefits, from a diverse range of opinions to synergies among team members, and assigning tasks to those who are best suited to them.

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    How PISA measures students’ ability to collaborate (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Late next month (21 November, to be exact) we’ll be releasing the results PISA’s first-ever assessment of students’ ability to solve problems collaboratively. Why has PISA focused on this particular set of skills? Because in today’s increasingly interconnected world, people are often required to collaborate in order to achieve their objectives, both in the workplace and in their personal lives.

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  • 31-October-2017

    English

    Education Indicators in Focus N° 55 - What are the gender differences and the labour market outcomes across the different fields of study?

    Although girls and boys perform similarly in the PISA science assessment at age 15, girls are less likely than boys to envision a career in science and engineering, even in countries where they outperform them.

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  • 30-October-2017

    English

    The fork in the road towards gender equality (OECD Education Today Blog)

    Gender biases can be persistent. Too persistent. A simple exercise to illustrate the point: Picture a doctor or a professor. You will most likely think of a man. Now think of nurses and teachers and you are likely to imagine a woman. This unconscious gender bias is rooted in years of associating male and female attributes to specific roles in society. Inevitably, it also influences students’ career choices.

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  • 27-October-2017

    English

    Computers and the Future of Skill Demand

    Computer scientists are working on reproducing all human skills using artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics. Unsurprisingly then, many people worry that these advances will dramatically change work skills in the years ahead and perhaps leave many workers unemployable.This report develops a new approach to understanding these computer capabilities by using a test based on the OECD’s Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) to compare computers with human workers. The test assesses three skills that are widely used at work and are an important focus of education: literacy, numeracy and problem solving with computers.Most workers in OECD countries use the three skills every day. However, computers are close to reproducing these skills at the proficiency level of most adults in the workforce. Only 13% of workers now use these skills on a daily basis with a proficiency that is clearly higher than computers.The findings raise troubling questions about whether most workers will be able to acquire the skills they need as these new computer capabilities are increasingly used over the next few decades. To answer those questions, the report’s approach could be extended across the full range of work skills. We need to know how computers and people compare across all skills to develop successful policies for work and education for the future.
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