Publications & Documents


  • 16-August-2011

    English

    Cool, clean water

    Without water we cannot survive. Yet billions of people still live without access to stable supplies of clean water, and a growing world population will put increasing pressure on this finite resource in years to come. How can we make better use of this precious commodity?

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  • 26-July-2011

    English

    Greening growth

    Growing one’s economy AND protecting the environment. They’re not mutually exclusive. In fact, green and growth go together. If you have never had electricity, solar power offers growth and green, for example. But what will it take to make green growth happen for everyone?

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  • 15-July-2011

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Hungary 2011

    The International Energy Agency's 2011 review of Hungary's energy policies and programmes. The review finds that regional co-operation is a vital element of Hungary's energy market and energy security policy. Hungary, which shares borders with seven countries, is well placed to improve regional energy security by catalysing the development of closely integrated regional markets for electricity and natural gas.

    A country strongly dependent on natural gas imports, Hungary has taken several commendable steps to manage risks to its supply. It has enhanced storage capacity and diversified cross-border capacity, and is developing new supply routes. Hungary is also working hard to strengthen the regional electricity market through new interconnectors and market coupling.

    Electricity demand within Hungary is expected to grow, while generating capacity is rapidly ageing. Investments are needed for grid improvements and generating capacity, both for increasing capacity (especially for low-carbon electricity) and replacing ageing plants. Ensuring predictable and attractive framework conditions for investing in energy infrastructure is crucial.

    The government is considering additional nuclear power units. The extent to which nuclear power capacity will be expanded should be clarified without unnecessary delay, as it will have broad implications for the viability of other current and future base-load technologies.

    Although per-capita energy consumption in Hungary is well below the OECD average, considerable potential remains for improving energy efficiency across all sectors. Measures to reduce consumption in the large existing building stock should be the governmentfs top priority for energy policy. Gradually, Hungary should also replace broad subsidies for energy use with direct support to those in need.

  • 8-July-2011

    English

    Eco-innovation and green growth

    The overall objective of this stream of work is to provide policy advice to help governments guide the development and deployment of eco-innovation in the context of the implementation of Green Growth strategies.

  • 8-July-2011

    English

    Carbon Pricing, Power Markets and the Competitiveness of Nuclear Power

    This study assesses the competitiveness of nuclear power against coal- and gas-fired power generation in liberalised electricity markets with either CO2 trading or carbon taxes. It uses daily price data for electricity, gas, coal and carbon from 2005 to 2010, which encompasses the first years of the European Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), the world’s foremost carbon trading framework. The study shows that even with modest carbon pricing, competition for new investment in electricity markets will take place between nuclear energy and gas-fired power generation, with coal-fired power struggling to be profitable. The outcome of the competition between nuclear and gas-fired generation hinges, in addition to carbon pricing, on the capital costs for new nuclear power plant construction, gas prices and the profit margins applied. Strong competition in electricity markets reinforces the attractiveness of nuclear energy, as does carbon pricing, in particular when the latter ranges between USD 40 and USD 70 per tonne of CO2. The data and analyses contained in this study provide a robust framework for assessing cost and investment issues in liberalised electricity markets with carbon pricing.
  • 7-July-2011

    English, , 707kb

    Policies to Support Eco-innovation in Israel

    Now that Israel has entered the OECD, the government has made significant efforts to push environmental initiatives such as the promotion of eco-innovation. This report provides an overview of governmental efforts to stimulate eco-innovation in the business sector and households.

  • 4-July-2011

    English

    Policy Interventions to Address Health Impacts Associated with Air Pollution, Unsafe Water Supply and Sanitation, and Hazardous Chemicals - Environment Working Paper No. 35

    This working paper reviews the recent empirical literature related to quantification and valuation of the human health impacts of air pollution, hazardous chemicals, unsafe water and sanitation, and their use in cost-benefit analysis, as an input to environmental policy decision-making.

  • 4-July-2011

    English

    Green growth and transport

    Transport has major environmental impacts in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, local air emissions and noise. Managing congestion more effectively is also part of the broader agenda for more sustainable development and better use of resources invested in infrastructure.

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  • 1-July-2011

    English

    Environmental Policy Stringency and Foreign Direct Investment - Environment Working Paper No. 33

    This paper examines empirically whether countries with relatively more lax environmental regimes have a comparative advantage in their competition for foreign direct investment.

  • 1-July-2011

    English

    Video: Elinor Ostrom on managing common pool resources

    How should we manage fisheries, forestry and other 'common pool' resources, where one person's use of them means less is available for others? Nobel Prize-winning economist Elinor Ostrom explains why we must change the way we think about managing common pool resources.

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