Did you know... that biodiversity is projected to decline by a further 10% by 2050 without more ambitious policies to protect it?

Did you know... that biodiversity offsets mobilised between USD 2.4 and 4 billion in 2011?

Did you know... 60% of the world’s major marine ecosystems have been degraded or are being used unsustainably.

Did you know... that biodiversity is projected to decline by a further 10% by 2050 without more ambitious policies to protect it?

Did you know... that biodiversity offsets mobilised between USD 2.4 and 4 billion in 2011?

Did you know... 60% of the world’s major marine ecosystems have been degraded or are being used unsustainably.

"Policies that encourage more sustainable consumption will be critical to mainstreaming biodiversity into the global web of our economies,"

Simon Upton, OECD Environment Director

Why a Convention on Biological Diversity?

Opened for signature at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and into force since December 1993. The Convention on Biological Diversity is an international treaty with three main objectives: 1) conservation of biological diversity; 2) sustainable use of the components of biological diversity, and 3) fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources. Read more on the Convention.

Oceans - What's happening 2017-18

OECD and SDG 14 on the Oceans, seas and marine resources

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are key to ensuring better conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity and the oceans.

The OECD participated at the Preparatory Meeting for the UN Conference on SDG14  |  15-16 February 2016  |  New York, United States:

  • Side event on Delivering on Sustainable Oceans for the SDGs - 15 February.


The OECD side-event covered new and forthcoming OECD work on:

Video - The battle for biodiversity

We are destroying the natural resources, wildlife and habitats that we depend upon for survival at a devastating pace.



Governments need to do more to conserve biodiversity by reducing harmful farm and fossil fuel support and using mechanisms like biodiversity offsets and taxes on activities that harm nature.

Join the conversation!

Reports and Policy Highlights

  • Biodiversity Offsets: Effective Design and Implementation examines the key design and implementation features that need to be considered to ensure that bioddiversity offset programmes are environmentally effective, economically efficient, and distrubitonally equitable. Insights and lessons are drawn from more than 40 case studies worldwide and 3 in-depth reviews from the United States, Germany and Mexico - read the Highlights.

 

 

  • The Political Economy of Biodiversity Policy Reform (forthcoming) draws lessons learned from the political economy of biodiversity related reforms from four case studies: French tax on pesticides; agricultural subsidy reform in Switzerland; European Union payments to Mauritania and Guinea Bissau to finance marine protected areas management; and individually transferable quotas for fisheries in Iceland - Read the Highlights.

 

  • Biodiversity and Development: Mainstreaming and managing for results focuses on three key areas: mainstreaming biodiversity and development objectives at the national and sectoral levels (e.g. in agriculture, fisheries, and forestry), and how to monitor and evaluate mainstreaming performance (forthcoming).