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Publications & Documents


  • 15-October-2021

    English

    Policies for a Carbon-Neutral Industry in the Netherlands

    This report presents a comprehensive assessment of the policy instruments adopted by the Netherlands to reach carbon neutrality in its manufacturing sector by 2050. The analysis illustrates the strength of combining a strong commitment to raising carbon prices with ambitious technology support, uncovers the pervasiveness of competitiveness provisions, and highlights the trade-off between short-term emissions cuts and longer-term technology shift. The Netherlands’ carbon levy sets an ambitious price trajectory to 2030, but is tempered by extensive preferential treatment to energy-intensive users, yielding a highly unequal carbon price across firms and sectors. The country’s technology support focuses on the cost-effective deployment of low-carbon options, which ensures least-cost decarbonisation in the short run but favours relatively mature technologies. The report offers recommendations for policy adjustments to reach the country’s carbon neutrality objective, including the gradual removal of exemptions, enhanced support for emerging technologies and greater visibility over future infrastructure plans.
  • 8-October-2021

    English

    Methodology for estimation of Energy Physical Supply and Use Tables based on IEA's World Energy Balances

    This paper develops a methodology for the estimation of Energy Physical Supply and Use Tables (E-PSUTs) based on the IEA’s World Energy Balances (WEB). The tables are similar to those proposed by the United Nations System of Environmental Economic Accounting. However, they fully exploit, and are consistent, with the information on fuel transformation processes available in the WEB. The E-PSUTs can be used to derive energy indicators in physical units. Additionally, they can be used in a hybrid methodological approach to link global energy production and consumption in physical units with global production and consumption in monetary units, allowing the development of indicators to better understand the multiple links between energy and the economy, contributing to climate change discussions. Furthermore, complementary analyses can be undertaken by linking the MF-IO model with variables such as industry value added and employment data. And, used to estimate energy-related CO2 emissions indicators.
  • 5-October-2021

    English

    Addressing digital gender divides

    This event on 5 October looked at the current state of various digital gender divides, priority areas for further benchmarking efforts, and policy priorities for closing digital gender gaps both domestically and via co-operation in international fora.

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  • 4-October-2021

    English

    Putting the OECD AI Principles into practice: Progress and future perspectives

    Watch the recording of this high-level discussion about progress in implementing the OECD Principles on Artificial Intelligence that took place 4 October as part of the OECD Ministerial Council meeting.

  • 30-September-2021

    English

    Venture capital investments in artificial intelligence - Analysing trends in VC in AI companies from 2012 through 2020

    New analysis of global investments by venture capitalists (VC) in private companies focused on artificial intelligence (AI) found VC investments in AI to be growing at a dramatic pace. The United States and the People’s Republic of China are leading this wave of investments that tend to concentrate on a few key industries. The data showed that the European Union, United Kingdom and Japan increased investments, but lag behind the two dominant players. The study analysed venture capital investments in 8 300 AI firms worldwide, covering 20 549 transactions between 2012 and 2020, based on data provided by Preqin, a private capital-markets analysis firm in London. The data did not capture every deal and required some extrapolation, yet the timeliness of the findings provides a valuable source of information as national governments, international organisations, public and private sectors develop policies and strategies to capture the benefits of AI for all.
  • 24-September-2021

    English

    Broadband policy and technology developments

    The promotion of widespread, affordable, and high-quality broadband is a prerequisite for the digital transformation of economies and societies. Foreseeing the role of broadband as an accelerator of economic, social and cultural development, the OECD adopted the Council Recommendation on Broadband Development in 2004. Since then, important developments have taken place in broadband technologies and markets. As part of the review of the 2004 Recommendation undertaken from 2018 to 2020 and resulting in the adoption of the revised 2021 OECD Council Recommendation on Broadband Connectivity, this report examines the evolution of broadband technologies, policies and regulation to foster broadband developments since 2004 as well as the benefits of, and challenges to, accelerating these developments to further enable digital transformation and inclusive growth.
  • 24-September-2021

    English

    Emerging trends in communication market competition

    Communication market structures and their effect on delivering efficient and inclusive connectivity is of key interest to policy makers and regulators. This report discusses emerging competition trends in OECD broadband markets that are shaping market structures, covering both fixed and mobile networks. The increasing complementarity of fixed and wireless networks and the convergence of previously separate markets have led to new forms of communication market competition. While convergence has been acting as a driver for market consolidation, there is also increased scrutiny in merger review. Some OECD countries are discussing options to keep mobile communication markets open to new entrants in the context of merger reviews, while others have experienced a recent wave of entry. The report explores the role of horizontal and vertical mergers in communication markets, presents examples of entry in mobile communication markets, and discusses some of effects of entry and consolidation in OECD markets.
  • 24-September-2021

    English

    Implementation and usage of the OECD Recommendation on Broadband Development

    Without connectivity, there can be no digital transformation of economies and societies. With this in mind, the OECD Recommendation of the Council on Broadband Development was adopted in 2004. Since then, broadband markets, underlying technologies, and the policies in place to spur the development of broadband networks have undergone significant changes. This document summarises the outcome of an extensive questionnaire sent to delegates of OECD countries and stakeholder groups. The questionnaire aimed to gather information on the experience of OECD countries concerning broadband development in general, and more particularly their experience in implementing the 2004 Recommendation. The responses to the questionnaire were used to inform the review and revision of the 2004 Recommendation, which resulted in the adoption of the 2021 OECD Council Recommendation on Broadband Connectivity.
  • 22-September-2021

    English

    Main Science and Technology Indicators

    A timely set of indicators that reflect the level and structure of the efforts undertaken by OECD member countries and selected non-member economies in the field of science and technology.

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  • 22-September-2021

    English

    Who develops AI-related innovations, goods and services? - A firm-level analysis

    This study proposes an exploratory analysis of the characteristics of Artificial Intelligence (AI) 'actors'. It focuses on entities that deploy AI-related technologies or introduce AI-related goods and services on large international markets. It builds on the OECD Science, Technology and Innovation Micro-data Lab infrastructure, and, in particular, on Intellectual Property (IP) rights data (patents and trademarks) combined with company-level data. Statistics on AI-related patents and trademarks show that AI-related activities are strongly concentrated in some countries, sectors, and actors. Development of AI technologies and/or goods and services is mainly due to start-ups or large incumbents, located in the United States, Japan, Korea, or the People’s Republic of China, and, to a lesser extent, in Europe. A majority of these actors operate in ICT-related sectors. The composition of the IP portfolio of the AI actors indicates that AI is frequently combined with a variety of sector-specific technologies, goods, or services.
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