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Reports


  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 426kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: United States

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: United States

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 430kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Belgium

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Belgium

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 402kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Estonia

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Estonia

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 410kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Finland

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Finland

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 416kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: France

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: France

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 427kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Norway

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Norway

  • 12-July-2021

    English, PDF, 407kb

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Lithuania

    Risks That Matter 2020 Country Highlights: Lithuania

  • 12-July-2021

    English

    Main Findings from the 2020 Risks that Matter Survey

    The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred perhaps the largest expansion of social protection systems in seventy years. Yet many people are still deeply affected by the crisis and are calling for even more help. Drawing on 25 000 responses across 25 OECD countries, the 2020 Risks that Matter survey finds that people are worried about keeping their jobs, paying the bills and staying healthy. Almost seven out of ten respondents say that their government should be doing more to ensure their economic and social security, and many are willing to pay more in taxes to support this. The perspectives presented in this report offer important lessons for how to expand and reform social protection as our societies and economies slowly start to recover from the pandemic.
  • 7-July-2021

    English

    Bringing Household Services Out of the Shadows - Formalising Non-Care Work in and Around the House

    Despite years of growth in the number of women in paid work, gender roles in unpaid housework have remained remarkably rigid. Unpaid housework can be outsourced to non-care household service providers, such as cleaners or housekeepers, however, high prices, a substantial tax burden and a lack of easy access impose barriers to greater formalisation of the household service sector. With the aim of increasing work-life balance for households, in particular for women in employment, and reducing the wide-ranging practice of undeclared employment, a number of OECD countries have implemented policies to formalise and boost the provision of non-care household services. This report illustrates the importance of the non-care household service sector and reviews international approaches in formalising the non-care household service market, ranging from providing tax incentives or granting social vouchers, to identify good practice. To highlight the potential economic gains that could follow from easing the housework burden, the report also estimates the economic value of unpaid housework provided by men and women.
  • 1-July-2021

    English

    Measuring What Matters for Child Well-being and Policies

    To design, implement and monitor effective child well-being policies, policy-makers need data that better capture children’s lives, measure what is important to them and detect emerging problems and vulnerabilities early on. Despite improvements in recent decades, there are still important gaps in both national and cross-national child data. Countries can achieve progress if the right actions are taken. Measuring What Matters for Child Well-being and Policies lays the groundwork for improved child well-being measurement and better data to inform better child well-being policies. It outlines an 'aspirational' framework for child well-being measurement, setting out which aspects of children’s lives should be measured, and how, to better monitor child well-being. It also outlines priorities for child data development and identifies key data gaps, all with the aim of motivating improvements in child data infrastructures.
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