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  • 26-October-2020

    English

    Ethnic bias, economic success and trust - Findings from large sample experiments in Germany and the United States through the Trustlab platform

    This paper studies ethnic in-group bias in online trust games played by two large representative samples in the United States and Germany through the Trustlab platform, which was launched by the OECD and several research partners in 2017. The ethnic in-group bias, defined as the propensity to favour members of one’s own ethnic group in terms of monetary payoff, is significant in both countries. In the United States, members of the three largest ethnic groups trust people from their own ethnic group more than those from other groups. African Americans have a larger in-group bias than White Americans and Hispanics. Ethnic differentiation is not selective, as each group tends to have lower trust in the two other ethnic groups but at roughly the same rate. In contrast, ethnic differentiation is strongly selective in Germany: subjects of German parentage discriminate twice as much against Turkish descent participants as against Eastern European descent participants. Members of both ethnic minorities in Germany trust each other less than their own ethnic group, but do not discriminate against ones of German parentage. We also examine whether releasing information on the trustee being rich reduces ethnic differentiation, while conjecturing that this is a way to remove the stereotype that ethnic minorities are 'undeserving poor'. We show that, in this case, discrimination by the ethnic majority is indeed reduced. People of Turkish descent who are rich tend to be more trusted than lower-income people of Turkish descent. However, releasing information on income can backfire, as it can increase mistrust within minorities. Finally, we show that group loyalty exists not only according to ethnicity but also according to income, as rich German parentage subjects trust other rich in-group members significantly more than do non-rich Germans.
  • 23-October-2020

    English

    Release Dates of the G20 International Merchandise Trade Statistics

    Release Dates of the G20 International Merchandise Trade Statistics

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  • 21-October-2020

    English

    Supply and Use Tables, database

    Supply-Use tables provide the key accounting mechanism to ensure that there is coherence between the various sources of data and approaches countries use to estimate GDP – expenditure, output and income. They also have the potential to inform a wide range of policy areas.

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  • 21-October-2020

    English

    Social Insurance Pension Schemes, database

    The 2008 SNA introduced a table on social insurance pension schemes (2008 SNA, Table 17.10) to provide a comprehensive overview of liabilities of all social insurance pension schemes in an economy. The OECD table on social insurance pension schemes reflects this new table. In addition to reflecting the pension liabilities of all social insurance pension schemes in an economy...

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  • 20-October-2020

    English

    International Trade Pulse, OECD - Updated: October 2020

    International merchandise trade showed signs of stabilising in August and September, following the strong pick-up in June and July, but it remains around 10-15% below pre-crisis levels in most economies. Services trade, in particular travel and passenger services, remained fragile, with total services trade around 20% below pre-crisis levels.

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  • 20-October-2020

    English

    The Future of Business Survey

    The Future of Business Survey, a partnership between Facebook, OECD, and The World Bank, is a new source of information on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

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  • 15-October-2020

    English

    Employment situation, OECD, second quarter 2020

    OECD area employment rate falls by 4.0 percentage points, to 64.6% in second quarter of 2020

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  • 12-October-2020

    English

    Unemployment Rates, OECD - Updated: October 2020

    OECD unemployment rate falls to 7.4% in August 2020 but remains 2.2 percentage points above February 2020

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  • 8-October-2020

    English

    Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, October 2020

    CLIs point to a moderation in growth

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  • 8-October-2020

    English, Excel, 834kb

    Interpreting OECD Composite Leading Indicators (CLIs)

    The recent economic and financial crisis has increased the spotlight on the OECD’s CLI and indeed broadened its base of users beyond its traditional specialised audience. To respond to the needs of this broader base, the OECD has decided to produce this note that provides a more accessible and less technical explanation of the CLI and the ways in which it should be interpreted.

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