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Reports


  • 5-November-2021

    English

    Regulatory Governance in the Mining Sector in Brazil

    Mining plays a crucial role in Brazil’s economy. Nonetheless, the efforts and resources devoted to regulatory quality in the sector, including the enforcement of rules, have not always been commensurate. This report identifies the gaps, barriers, implementation flaws and inefficiencies in the regulatory framework of the mining sector in Brazil. It takes stock of the recent reforms in the mining sector in Brazil, identifies areas that pose the greatest challenges for effective regulation in mining. It also describes the reforms that created the National Mining Agency of Brazil, its governance arrangements and its current regulatory practices. These are assessed against OECD principles in regulatory policy and mining regulation, as well as against country experiences from Australia, Chile, and Mexico. Finally, recommendations are provided to support further reform efforts.
  • 27-October-2021

    English

    Driving Performance at Brazil’s Electricity Regulatory Agency

    As 'market referees', regulators contribute to the delivery of essential public utilities. Their organisational culture, behaviour, actions and governance are important factors in how they, and the sectors they oversee, perform. The OECD Performance Assessment Framework for Economic Regulators (PAFER) looks at the institutions, processes and practices that can create an organisational culture of performance and results. This report uses PAFER to assess both the internal and external governance of Brazil’s Electricity Regulatory Agency (ANEEL). The review offers recommendations for the regulator to build upon its strong technical reputation and good practices. It proposes an integrated set of recommendations to help the regulator best fulfil its role as a key actor supporting sector modernisation.
  • 25-October-2021

    English

    Improving Regulatory Delivery in Food Safety - Mitigating Old and New Risks, and Fostering Recovery

    This report describes how regulators around the world adapted to the confusion brought by the COVID-19 crisis to ensure the supply of food while maintaining food safety and security. It brings together examples of regulatory responses at regional, national and international levels. The report also discusses how, despite all the challenges, the pandemic has helped uncover new regulatory tools and foster a culture of flexibility and agility in regulatory systems.
  • 22-October-2021

    English, PDF, 1,678kb

    The European architectural sector

    The European architectural sector

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  • 14-October-2021

    English

    Regulatory reform: events and publications

    Access and search the calendar of events and publications on regulatory policy.

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  • 14-October-2021

    English

    Regulatory Policy and the COVID-19 Crisis

    Regulatory policy activities to tackle the Covid-19 crisis

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  • 9-October-2021

    English

    Empowering Youth and Building Trust in Jordan

    With a share of 36%, youth (aged 12-30) represent more than one-third of the total population in Jordan. Public governance is critical for supporting youth’s transition to full autonomy and providing opportunities for their participation in economic, social and public life. The COVID-19 has hit young people in Jordan hard and has underlined the importance of access to high-quality public services and to opportunities to participate in decision making. This report provides an analysis of the governance arrangements put in place by the Government of Jordan to deliver youth-responsive policy outcomes with a focus on five areas: 1) Jordan’s National Youth Strategy 2019-25, 2) Institutional capacities of the Ministry of Youth, 3) Governance tools to mainstream youth’s considerations in policy making and service delivery, 4) Youth participation and representation in public life and 5) Youth-responsive legal frameworks.
  • 6-October-2021

    English

    OECD Regulatory Policy Outlook 2021

    Laws and regulations govern the everyday life of businesses and citizens, and are essential tools of public policy. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the crucial role regulation plays in the economy and society, but has also exposed gaps in domestic and international rule-making that have cost lives and money. The 2021 Regulatory Policy Outlook, the third in the series, maps country efforts to improve regulatory quality in line with the 2012 OECD Recommendation on Regulatory Policy and Governance, and shares good regulatory practices that can help close the gaps. It provides unique insights into how countries approach the design, enforcement and revision of regulations, and suggests where countries can best focus their efforts to ensure that laws and regulations work as intended. Finally, it discusses some agile and innovative approaches to rule making such as regulatory sandboxes, behavioural insights, and outcome-based, data-driven and risk-based regulation.
  • 6-October-2021

    English

    Recommendation of the Council on Regulatory Policy and Governance

    This Recommendation sets out the current thinking on how to effectively implement regulatory policy in countries, based on over a decade of OECD experience. "This Recommendation is the first comprehensive international statement on regulatory policy since the crisis", says Angel Gurría.

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  • 25-September-2021

    English

    Data-Driven, Information-Enabled Regulatory Delivery

    Industries and businesses are becoming increasingly digital, and the COVID-19 pandemic has further accelerated this trend. Regulators around the world are also experimenting with data-driven tools to apply and enforce rules in a more agile and targeted way. This report maps out several efforts undertaken jointly by the OECD and Italian regulators to develop and use artificial intelligence and machine learning tools in regulatory inspections and enforcement. It provides unique insights into the background processes and structures required for digital tools to perform predictive modelling, risk analysis and classification. It also highlights the challenges such tools bring, both in specific regulatory areas and to the broader goals of regulatory systems.
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