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Gender Equality in Chile

Towards a Better Sharing of Paid and Unpaid Work

The OECD review of Gender Equality in Chile: Towards a Better Sharing of Paid and Unpaid Work is the first of a series addressing Latin American and the Caribbean countries. It compares gender gaps in labour and educational outcomes in Chile with other countries. Particular attention is put on the uneven distribution of unpaid work, and the extra burden this places on women. It investigates how policies and programmes in Chile can make this distribution more equitable. The first part of the report reviews the evidence on gender gaps and on what causes these, including the role played by attitudes. The second part develops a comprehensive framework to address these challenges, presenting a broad range of options to reduce the unpaid work burden falling on women, and to increase women’s labour income. The final part discusses the impact of the COVID-19 crisis and considers how the policy priorities of the government will have to change to address these.

Published on July 13, 2021Also available in: Spanish

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword
Executive summary
Gender gaps in Chile: An international and sub-national comparison
A holistic policy framework for achieving a balanced sharing of paid and unpaid work
The compounding effects of COVID‑19
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Closing Gender Gaps: A moral and social imperative

Closing gender gaps in paid and unpaid work responsibilities is not only a moral and social imperative but also a central part of any successful strategy for stronger, more sustainable and more inclusive growth.

Closing gender gaps in paid and unpaid work responsibilities is not only a moral and social imperative but also at the core of any successful strategy for stronger, more sustainable and more inclusive growth. The COVID-19 crisis and the associated lock-down measures have placed this cause at the top of the agenda of all countries by showing in an unprecedented way that without addressing the unequal work division between genders, women will continue to have a hard time catching up with men’s earnings and financial security.