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Social and welfare issues


  • 8-September-2021

    English

    OECD/Korea Policy Centre – Health and Social Policy Programmes

    The OECD/Korea Policy Centre fosters the exchange of technical information and policy experiences relating to the Asia Pacific region in areas such as health statistics, pension reforms and social policy and expenditure.

  • 30-June-2019

    English

    OECD supporting G20 policy priorities at Osaka Summit

    At their Summit in Osaka this weekend, G20 leaders agreed on a range of priorities for which analysis and support from the OECD and other international organisations are playing a crucial role.

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  • 30-April-2019

    English, PDF, 335kb

    Japan Policy Brief : Enhancing private pension savings

    Japan has been ageing rapidly due to improvements in life expectancy and low fertility rates. This challenges the financial sustainability, solvency and adequacy of the pension system.

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  • 15-April-2019

    English

    Liberal Democratic Party of Japan: Seminar on “Empowering Women”

    As championed by Prime Minister Abe, the role of women in public life is crucial for a prosperous economy and sustainable inclusive growth. Better gender balance among politicians promotes inclusive policymaking and boosts trust in government. To increase women’s representation in politics, it is vital that parties themselves are inclusive and promote female candidates during elections.

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  • 10-April-2019

    English, PDF, 733kb

    The Squeezed Middle Class - How does Japan compare?

    This country fact-sheet presents key figures from "Under Pressure: The Squeezed Middle Class". This report analyses the trends of middle-income households in areas such as employment, consumption, wealth and debt, as well as perceptions and social attitudes. It also includes recommendations for protecting middle-class living standards and financial security in the face of economic challenges.

  • 27-March-2019

    English, PDF, 694kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Japan compare?

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

  • 27-March-2019

    Japanese, PDF, 1,570kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Japan compare? in Japanese

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 13-April-2018

    English

    Third Patient Safety Global Ministerial Summit

    I am delighted to be here today to address the Third Patient Safety Global Ministerial Summit. Let me begin by congratulating the Government of Japan and in particular Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare, Mr. Katsunobu Kato, for hosting this very important conference and for placing patient safety high on the global agenda.

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  • 10-April-2018

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Tokyo on 11-13 April 2018

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, was in Tokyo on an official visit from 11 to 13 April 2018. He held bilateral meetings with Prime Minister Abe as well as with several Ministers and high level Japanese officials.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Investing in Youth: Japan

    The present report on Japan is the seventh report in the Investing in Youth series. In three statistical chapters, the report provides an overview of the labour market situation of young people in Japan, presents a portrait of young people who are not in employment, education or training (the NEETs) and analyses the income situation of young people in Japan. Two policy chapters provide recommendations on how Japan can improve the school-to-work transition of disadvantaged young people, and on how employment, social and training programmes can help the NEETs find their way back into education or work. Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016).
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