Reports


  • 27-June-2016

    English

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus - Preliminary version

    The Productivity-Inclusiveness Nexus proposes a new approach to boost productivity growth while, at the same time, reducing inequalities of income and opportunities. The report begins by examining the trend slowdown of productivity growth, which has been observed in many OECD countries over recent years, and the longer-standing rise - and persistence - of inequalities of income, wealth, well-being and opportunities. It then gathers the most recent empirical evidence on some of the common foundations behind these trends and considers possible linkages. The analysis aims to shed light on policy insights to address both issues together, creating room for synergies and win-win policies.

  • 21-June-2016

    English

    15 years of the National Contact Points

    Fifteen years after the creation of National Contact Points as a means to improve the implementation of the Guidelines, the OECD has conducted an analysis of the functioning and performance of the National Contact Points.

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  • 21-June-2016

    English

    Monitoring investment and trade measures

    G20 Leaders are firmly committed to open trade and investment and to resisting protectionism in all its forms. They have mandated WTO, OECD and UNCTAD – the leading international organisations in the area of international trade and investment policies – to monitor policy developments and report publicly on these commitments.

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  • 17-June-2016

    English

    International investment law

    The OECD is a forum where treaty negotiators and experts from OECD and non-OECD countries work together to enhance common understanding of core treaty provisions and emerging legal issues and to improve outcomes of international investment agreements for governments and investors. This page provides a comprehensive overview of OECD work in this domain.

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  • 15-June-2016

    English

  • 9-June-2016

    English

    Mobilising investment in clean energy infrastructure

    Investment in clean energy infrastructure needs to be scaled up to support the broader development, economic and climate agenda. This will require leveraging private investment, however investment in this area remains constrained by barriers, including market and government failures. This page describes what tools the OECD provides to governments to create an enabling environment for investment flows to clean energy infrastructure.

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  • 9-June-2016

    English

    Freedom of investment at the OECD

    International investment spurs prosperity and economic development in home and recipient countries. Policy coordination helps governments resist protectionist pressures and develop effective policies. The OECD's Freedom of Investment process brings together some 54 governments from around the world to exchange information and experiences on investment policies at regular roundtables.

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  • 9-June-2016

    English

    The impact of investment treaties on companies, shareholders and creditors

    Investment treaties are intended to offer foreign investors protection for their investments from host government conduct in violation of the treaty. This report examines how many investment treaties, as interpreted, have generated rules that can disrupt fundamental principles of corporate governance and corporate finance.

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  • 9-June-2016

    English

    Fragmentation in clean energy investment and financing

    Scaling-up investment in renewable electricity is critical for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. Despite increasing cost-competitiveness, overall investment in renewables projects remains constrained by policy and market obstacles. These hinder development of a sufficient pipeline of bankable projects and affect the risk-return profile of renewable electricity projects.

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  • 9-June-2016

    English

    OECD Business and Finance Outlook 2016

    It is seven years since the global crisis and despite easy monetary policy, financial regulatory reform, and G20 resolutions favouring structural measures, the world economy is not making a lot of progress. Indeed, the responses to the crisis seem mainly to have stopped the banks from failing and then pushed the many faces of the crisis around between regions—currently taking the form of excess capacity in emerging markets. Productivity growth raises income per head, allows companies to pay better wages and it raises demand to help to eliminate excess capacity and improve employment. However, this element is missing in the global corporate sector. The theme of this year’s Business and Finance Outlook is fragmentation: the inconsistent structures, policies, rules, laws and industry practices that appear to be blocking business efficiency and productivity growth.

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