Southeast Asia

 

Southeast Asia is of strategic importance to the OECD. The Organisation’s activities in the region started to develop in the 1990s and intensified in the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis. The OECD then established a “Special Programme of Policy Dialogue on Issues Arising from Financial Instability in Non member Economies”.

In May 2007, the OECD’s Council meeting at Ministerial level invited the Secretary-General to explore and develop recommendations to Council on how to expand the OECD's relations, including through enhanced engagement, with selected countries and regions of strategic interest to the OECD, identified by Council. In the light of its growing importance in the world economy, priority was given to Southeast Asia, with a view to identifying countries for possible membership. Following this mandate, the Organisation has pursued a dual track approach combining regional initiatives with country-specific work, in close co-operation with regional organisations including the ASEAN and the Asian Development Bank.

 

The OECD’s regional work spans across a wide range of policy areas, including corporate governancetax policy, capital markets, the fight against corruption, and more recently investment policyinnovationregulatory reform and employment and skills development.

 

Regional programmes often involve joint policy analysis, dialogues to exchange policy experiences and build networks among government officials and other stakeholders, and training and capacity building. The OECD’s country-specific work, which targets the more developed of the ten ASEAN countries (i.e., Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia and to a lesser extent the Philippines), encompasses:

  • Selected participation in OECD Committees and Working Groups.
  • Policy reviews and country-specific studies.
  • Integration of relevant data series in OECD databases.
  • Technical assistance and capacity building activities.

Learn about the OECD Southeast Asia Regional Programme

 

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