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Publications & Documents


  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,290kb

    How's life in Estonia?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,272kb

    How's life in Denmark?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,328kb

    How's life in Canada?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,331kb

    How's life in Belgium?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English, PDF, 1,259kb

    How's life in Austria?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2020.

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  • 9-March-2020

    English

    How's Life? 2020 - Measuring Well-being

    How’s Life? charts whether life is getting better for people in 37 OECD countries and 4 partner countries. This fifth edition presents the latest evidence from an updated set of over 80 indicators, covering current well-being outcomes, inequalities, and resources for future well-being. Since 2010, people’s well-being has improved in many respects, but progress has been slow or deteriorated in others, including how people connect with each other and their government. Large gaps by gender, age and education persist across most well-being outcomes. Generally, OECD countries that do better on average also feature greater equality between population groups and fewer people living in deprivation. Many OECD countries with poorer well-being in 2010 have since experienced the greatest gains. However, advances in current well-being have not always been matched by improvements in the resources that sustain well-being over time, with warning signs emerging across natural, human, economic and social capital. Beyond an overall analysis of well-being trends since 2010, this report explores in detail the 15 dimensions of the OECD Better Life Initiative, including health, subjective well-being, social connections, natural capital, and more, and looks at each country’s performance in dedicated country profiles.
  • 26-November-2019

    English

    Measuring Business Impacts on People’s Well-being and Sustainability

    ‌What is the contribution of business to people’s and communities’ well-being? How do businesses impact their environment and how sustainable are their practices? The OECD Statistics Directorate is expanding its work on measuring well-being at the country level to include the business community.

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  • 10-October-2019

    English

    Putting Well-being Metrics into Policy Action, 3-4 October 2019

    The goal of this workshop is to assist national governments in developing innovative approaches to putting people’s well-being at the centre of public policy.

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  • 18-December-2018

    English

    OECD Research and Development Expenditure in Industry 2018 - ANBERD

    This 2018 edition of OECD Research and Development Expenditure in Industry provides statistical data on R&D expenditure broken down by industrial and service sectors. Data are presented in current and constant USD PPP values. Coverage is provided for 31 OECD countries and four non-member economies. The coverage of ANBERD includes multiple sectors, with extended coverage of service sectors according to ISIC Revision 4 classification. This publication is a unique source of detailed internationally-comparable business R&D data, making it an invaluable tool for economic research and analysis.
  • 27-November-2018

    English

    New report says better metrics could have prompted stronger response to the crisis

    Better measurement of the economy and of people’s well-being could have led governments to respond more strongly to mitigate the damage caused by the 2008 financial crisis and reduce people’s continuing loss of trust in public institutions, according to a new report.

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