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  • 24-June-2015

    English

    11th Annual Meeting of the OECD LEED Forum on Partnerships and Local Development (Manchester, United Kingdom)

    Local policymakers have a critical role to play in developing more resilient and inclusive economies. This event will explore topics ranging from empowering communities through local leadership to new approaches to local economic growth and catalysing growth through people by better harnessing skills and increasing productivity.

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  • 3-juin-2015

    Français

    Podium: Innovation et mobilité urbaine au Brésil

    « Qu’est-ce que la cité, sinon le peuple ? » s’exclame Shakespeare dans Coriolan. En effet, la population et la qualité de vie sont toujours au cœur de la planification urbaine. Au Brésil, les grandes agglomérations ont pris forme dans les années 1950, lorsque le pays comptait environ 52 millions d’habitants, dont 36,2 % seulement dans les villes.

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Prague: A single speed for progress

    A city’s brand is pivotal for its position in global society, particularly in global competition. Indeed, a city has many aspects of a commercial product. The very strong international brand that I represent is Prague, the million-strong capital of the Czech Republic.

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  • 19-May-2015

    English

    National Prosperity Through Modern Rural Policy - 10th OECD Rural Conference, Memphis, USA

    As the OECD celebrates its 10th Rural Conference this edition will look at the next steps for the OECD Rural Policy Programme and consider the direction for future work.

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  • 8-May-2015

    English

    Baltimore: Smacked Down by the Invisible Hand - Insights Blog

    The recent riots in Baltimore following the death of Freddy Gray bring a tragic focus, once again, on inequality. Maryland’s largest city, Baltimore is a perfect laboratory to study it, thanks in part to the superb comparative statistics the city keeps. OECD Insights Blog.

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  • 5-May-2015

    English

    Senescence in the City - OECD Insights blog

    Blog: Anecdotal evidence suggests there are loads of grumpy old men and women around. A new, evidence-based report from the OECD offers some clues as to why this should be.

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  • 30-April-2015

    English

    Ageing in Cities: Cities need to plan ahead for an ageing population

    This report shows that cities in advanced economies are growing older more quickly than rural areas. In OECD cities, 14% of people were over 65 in 2011 up from 12% in 2001. The trend will put pressure on cities to rethink some infrastructure and plan for an ageing labour force, change in revenue lower tax revenues, rising demand for social housing and higher spending on health and social care.

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  • 24-April-2015

    English

    Urban Mobility System Upgrade: How shared self-driving cars could change city traffic?

    This report explores this question on the basis of detailed mobility data including origin, destination and timing of all trips for a mid-sized European city. ITF developed a model to test various alternative transport system configurations that would provide the same level of mobility (locations and timing) as today.

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  • 21-April-2015

    English

    Public Investment Toolkit: Guidance for regional & local government

    This online resource will guide you in implementing the OECD Principles on Effective Public Investment Across Levels of Government. In addition to better familiarising yourself with the 12 Principles, the Toolkit lets you compare indicators and best practices in use in numerous countries, regions and municipalities.

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  • 18-April-2015

    English

    OECD Urban Policy Reviews: China 2015

    China needs a new model of urbanisation to match the shift to a new model of growth. For decades, both urbanisation and growth have been based on robust export demand, cheap labour, cheap land and artificially low pricing of environmental externalities. None of these can support growth or urban development in the future.

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