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Publications


  • 7-May-2024

    English

    A review of Mexico’s participation in global value chains

    Mexico is well integrated into global value chains (GVCs). Its exports as a share of GDP have tripled since 1988. Mexico’s participation in GVCs is mainly driven by backward linkages, i.e. the share of foreign value added in Mexico’s total exports is large, which reflects Mexico’s importance in assembling processes in some manufacturing sectors. Conversely, forward participation, i.e. to what extent trading partners exports incorporate Mexico’s value added, remains low. Ongoing nearshoring trends provide opportunities to strengthen and improve Mexico’s participation in GVCs, and to move up in the value chain and develop stronger forward linkages, which are associated to higher productivity growth. This paper zooms into the most recent developments to assess whether Mexico is already benefiting from these trends. The empirical analysis suggests that Mexico’s wide trade agreements and low tariffs, will help, but improving the business environment and the rule of law, a better educated workforce, or increasing female labour participation would also facilitate deepening forward GVCs linkages.
  • 7-May-2024

    English

    Harnessing nearshoring opportunities in Mexico by boosting productivity and fighting climate change

    Mexico has large potential to boost its productivity and attract investment from companies looking to relocate their operations to North America. It also has an historic opportunity to spread the benefits of trade throughout the country, integrate SMEs more forcefully into value chains and to create more and better value chain linkages. Nearshoring is also an opportunity to step up efforts to address and mitigate climate change. Fully realising these opportunities will require addressing long standing challenges related to transport and digital connectivity, regulations, the rule of law, renewable energy and water scarcity.
  • 7-May-2024

    English

    Reducing inequalities and bolstering growth in Mexico

    Continuing the recent fall in income inequality and poverty will necessitate stepping up efforts to both address pressing social issues and bolster economic growth. Redoubling efforts to improve education outcomes would help Mexicans gaining the skills needed to participate in an evolving job market and boost Mexico’s growth potential. Mexico has much to gain from closing gender participation gaps, as it would lead to stronger growth overall and to a more equitable distribution of income and opportunities. Reducing informality would not only ensure greater job security and social protection for workers but also stimulate economic growth.
  • 7-May-2024

    English

    Strengthening Pandemic Preparedness and Response Through Integrated Modelling

    The impacts of epidemics and pandemics can go beyond health and the health sector, threatening livelihoods and other economic sectors. The complexity and uncertainty surrounding these events and the potential multidimensional and distributional impacts of response options imply that policy-making should be informed by evidence from the integration of disciplines and through intersectoral collaborations. Integrated epidemiologic-macroeconomic modelling (integrated modelling) can serve as a tool to explicitly adopt a multi-perspective and multi-dimensional approach to epidemics and pandemics and systematically consider the benefits and costs of different policy strategies and their distribution within society. Although integrated modelling promises to overcome the siloed disciplines and inherent tensions of priority-setting, the use of mathematical modelling in policy-making and the capacity of producing integrated models vary across country contexts. This guide proposes four initiatives and associated activities that can be adapted to context to enhance the production and use of integrated modelling before, during and after an epidemic or pandemic.
  • 6-May-2024

    English

    Understanding the contribution of Flanders’ public marine data to society

    Large volumes of marine data – much of it collected through observing systems and research projects and made publicly available for reuse by anybody through specialised repositories – are required for science, ocean economic activity and effective management of marine space. This report summarises the results of an OECD survey of the users of Flanders-based public marine data repositories and details how societal value is generated through their data reuses. Responses to the OECD survey reveal how Flanders’ repositories enable the reuse of marine data across a range of sectors, contribute to improved decision making, and generate benefits for wider society. Stylised value chains of public marine data are constructed and visualised from the responses, revealing information that is otherwise not collected by repositories so that they can keep access to the data as open as possible. This work is part of the OECD Value Chains of Public Marine Data project and relates to broader efforts to improve understanding of the economics of open data.
  • 6-May-2024

    English

    Defining AI incidents and related terms

    As AI use grows, so do its benefits and risks. These risks can lead to actual harms ('AI incidents') or potential dangers ('AI hazards'). Clear definitions are essential for managing and preventing these risks. This report proposes definitions for AI incidents and related terms. These definitions aim to foster international interoperability while providing flexibility for jurisdictions to determine the scope of AI incidents and hazards they wish to address.
  • 6-May-2024

    English

    An OECD survey of employee well-being - An instrument to measure employee well-being inside companies

    This working paper provides an overview of a standardised Employee Well-being Survey implemented in four companies in Japan. This survey aligns with international measurement guidelines and practices, including the 2017 OECD Guidelines on Measuring the Quality of the Working Environment, it has been developed under the guidance of the Committee on Statistics and Statistical Policy, and it allows for the calculation at firm level of an equivalent of the Job Strain index, namely the third pillar of the OECD Job Quality framework. The objectives of the study were: i) to pilot the new Employee Well-being Survey at the firm level; ii) to demonstrate the potential of harmonised employee survey data as a source of information on business social performance, with associated benefits for companies, stakeholders, investors, governments and national statistical offices; and iii) to operationalise one element of a proposed framework on measuring non-financial performance of businesses.
  • 3-mai-2024

    Français

    Les effets de la coercition économique sur les échanges internationaux

    Depuis quelques années, on observe avec inquiétude que des pays appliquent, ou menacent d’appliquer, des mesures économiques coercitives, souvent dans le domaine des échanges et de l’investissement. Si la coercition économique fait l’objet d’une attention croissante dans des enceintes internationales comme le G7, on dispose de peu d’informations au sujet des effets de ces mesures sur les économies visées et sur leurs autres partenaires commerciaux. Cette étude livre une première analyse économique objective de la coercition économique dans l’optique de faire mieux connaître ce phénomène et de servir de point de départ à des réflexions plus poussées sur le sujet.
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  • 3-May-2024

    English

    Development Co-operation Principles for Relevant and Effective Support to Media and the Information Environment

    These Development Co-operation Principles for Relevant and Effective Support to Media and the Information Environment are a product of the Development Assistance Committee’s Network on Governance. The Principles aim to respond to the need to ensure that the international response to the crisis in the media sector fits better in a rapidly changing information environment. The Principles were informed by an inclusive consultation process and strongly driven by members and partner organisations.
  • 2-May-2024

    English

    Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India - Volume 2024 Issue 1

    The Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India is a regular publication on regional economic growth and development in Emerging Asia – Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam, as well as China and India. It comprises three parts: a regional economic monitor, a thematic chapter addressing a major issue facing the region, and a series of country notes. The 2024 edition discusses the region’s macroeconomic challenges such as external headwinds, impacts of El Niño and elevated levels of private debt. The thematic chapter focuses on strategies to cope with more frequent disasters. Emerging Asia is among the world’s most disaster-prone regions, and the threat of disasters, such as floods, storms, earthquakes and droughts, is increasing. The report explores how countries can reduce disaster risks and improve resilience by developing a comprehensive approach involving policy measures such as improving governance and institutional capacity, ensuring adequate budgets and broadening financing options, strengthening disaster-related education, improving land planning, investing in disaster-resilient infrastructure and disaster-related technology, improving health responses, and facilitating the role of the private sector.
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