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République-Unie de Tanzanie


  • 10-juin-2021

    Français

    Financer l’extension de l’assurance sociale aux travailleurs de l’économie informelle à l’aide des transferts de fonds

    L'emploi informel, défini par l'absence de protection sociale basée sur l'emploi, constitue la majeure partie de l'emploi dans les pays en développement, et entraîne un niveau de vulnérabilité à la pauvreté et à d'autres risques qui sont supportés par tous ceux qui dépendent des revenus du travail informel. Les résultats de la base de données des Indicateurs clés de l’informalité en fonction des individus et leurs ménages (KIIbIH) montrent qu'un nombre disproportionné de travailleurs de l'économie informelle de la classe moyenne reçoivent des transferts de fonds. Ces résultats confirment que les stratégies de gestion des risques, telles que la migration, jouent un rôle dans la minimisation des risques potentiels du travail informel pour les ménages informels de la classe moyenne qui peuvent ne pas être éligibles à l'aide sociale. Ils suggèrent en outre que les travailleurs informels de classe moyenne peuvent avoir une demande solvable d'assurance sociale, de sorte que, si des régimes d'assurance sociale adaptés aux besoins des travailleurs informels leur étaient accessibles, les transferts de fonds pourraient potentiellement être canalisés pour financer l'extension de l'assurance sociale à l'économie informelle.
  • 17-March-2021

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 22-mai-2017

    Français

  • 26-April-2017

    English

    Social Protection in East Africa - Harnessing the Future

    This strategic foresight report assesses the interaction between demographics, economic development, climate change and social protection in six countries in East Africa between now and 2065: Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. The report combines population projections with trends in health, urbanisation, migration and climate change and identifies the implications for economic development and poverty. It concludes by identifying policies to address seven grand challenges for social protection planners in national governments and donor agencies which emerge from the projections. These include: eliminating extreme poverty; extending social insurance in a context of high informality; the rapid growth of the working-age population, in particular the youth; adapting social protection to urban settings; protecting the poor from the effects of climate change; harnessing a demographic dividend; and substantially increasing funding for social protection.
  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Tanzania - Public Works Assessment

    A Two-week field mission to Tanzania was held to assess the effectiveness of public works programmes in 10 villages.

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  • 23-December-2013

    English

    Tanzania - OECD Investment Policy Review

    This Investment Policy Review examines Tanzania's achievements in developing an open and transparent investment regime and its efforts to reduce restrictions on international investment.

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  • 23-December-2013

    English

    OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Tanzania 2013

    This review of investment policy in Tanzania evaluates the current policy situation and makes recommendations for  enabling Tanzania to attract higher investment to exploit its full potential and become a regional trade and investment hub. The review finds that while private investment in Tanzania has considerably risen since the early 1990s, further progress can be made to improve the business climate and attract more investment in key sectors, such as infrastructure and agriculture. Informed by the subsequent chapters of this report, this overview provides policy options to address these challenges. In particular, investors’ rights and obligations could be rationalised and made more accessible and regulations on foreign investment and investment incentives reviewed. The land legislation could be revised and land rights registration accelerated, notably by providing stronger incentives for registration. The short-term and long-term costs and benefits of the regulatory restrictions imposed by crop boards and of export bans could be closely analysed.
  • 19-March-2013

    English

    Investment policy reform in Tanzania

    The Tanzanian government, in partnership with the OECD and NEPAD, has undertaken a review of its investment policies to support its national strategy for economic reform and to improve the business climate and attract more investment in key sectors, such as infrastructure and agriculture. This page describes the review process.

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  • 17-May-2012

    English, , 353kb

    DFID'S Education Programme in Three East African Countries: Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tanzania

    The ICAI report says that these countries the UK has succeeded in boosting enrolment substantially but ICAI raises concerns that the quality of education being provided is so low that it detracts from the development impact.

  • 1-May-2012

    English, , 4,611kb

    Finnish support to development of local governance

    The purpose of the evaluation is to make a wider assessment of Finland’s support in local governance and decentralisation in Kenya, Namibia, South Africa and Tanzania.

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