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  • 29-April-2016

    English

    Going going gone? Routine jobs in Global Value Chains

    Analysis relying on a new OECD measure of the routine intensity of occupations shows the extent to which countries differ in the share of employment accounted for by routine jobs. It finds that while technological innovation is always associated with higher employment, ICTs correlates positively with employment in all occupations but not in high-routine jobs. Finally, offshoring need not hurt routine-intensive workers.

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  • 19-April-2016

    English

    12th Annual Meeting: Creativity, jobs and local development (Venice, Italy)

    This year the Forum will focus on creativity, jobs and local development. We will examine how localities can support culture and creative industries as a source of knowledge and job creation and how the creative industry can act as a powerful driving force areas such as tourism, urban regeneration, and social inclusion.

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  • 19-avril-2016

    Français

    Situation de l'emploi dans la zone OCDE, quatrième trimestre 2015

    Le taux d’emploi de l’OCDE retrouve son niveau d'avant la crise au quatrième trimestre 2015

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  • 12-avril-2016

    Français

    Taux de chômage harmonisés de l'OCDE - Mise à jour : avril 2016

    Le taux de chômage de la zone OCDE stable à 6.5% en février 2016

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  • 8-April-2016

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Assessing and Anticipating Changing Skill Needs

    Digitalisation, globalisation, demographic shifts and other changes in work organisation are constantly reshaping skill needs. This can lead to persistent skill shortages and mismatch which are costly for individuals, firms and society in terms of lost wages and lower productivity and growth. These costs can be reduced through better assessment and anticipation of changing skill needs and by improving the responsiveness of skills development to these changes.
    This report identifies effective strategies for improving labour market information on skill needs and ensuring that this information is used effectively to develop the right skills. It provides a comparative assessment of practices across 29 countries in the following areas: i) the collection of information on existing and future skill needs; ii) the use of this information to guide skill development policies in the areas of labour, education and migration; and iii) governance arrangements to ensure good co-ordination among the key stakeholders in the collection and use of skill needs information.

     

  • 6-April-2016

    English

    Limited access to employment services hurts vulnerable laid-off workers in Australia

    Australia should provide early access to more intensive employment services for disadvantaged laid-off workers to help them find a new job more quickly, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 30-March-2016

    English

    A New Initiative: Adapting to Changing Skills Needs

    Today the OECD is launching a new project with JP Morgan and Chase Foundation to measure and analyse skills needs in a harmonized way across countries. Experts from various countries and fields of discipline are meeting at the OECD to discuss methodological issues involved in developing a cross-country indicator of skill needs. By informing policy, this new data tool will make strides towards addressing skill shortages.

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  • 30-March-2016

    English, PDF, 192kb

    OECD and J.P. Morgan join forces to tackle global skills mismatch

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and J.P. Morgan through its Foundation today launched a new project “Adapting to Changing Skills Needs” to fill knowledge gaps in the assessment of skill mismatches and to identify international best practice in addressing them.

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  • 23-March-2016

    English

    What skills do employers want?

    A discussion on how can we reconcile the apparently contradicting views of labour market demand for soft skills versus technical job-specific skills.

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  • 22-March-2016

    English

    Mark Keese speaks to the Worklife Hub about OECD’s new initiative on the Future of Work.

    Openness to change and a continuous questioning of the way we work are the keys to being prepared for the Future of Work. This advice comes from Mark Keese, Head of the Employment Analysis and Policy Division at the OECD, and we catch up with Mark following the OECD's Future of Work Forum in January 2016.

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