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  • 12-August-2021

    English

    OECD Economic Surveys: Malaysia 2021

    Like many other countries, Malaysia was hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic starting in early 2020. Its past policy prudence has allowed Malaysia to react swiftly and boldly to the public health and economic crisis. Nevertheless, the crisis revealed the necessity of further reforms that Malaysia needs to pursue in order to achieve more inclusive and high growth after the pandemic. Vulnerable workers have been more affected during the pandemic and many firms have been urged to use digital tools, such as e-commerce and teleworking, for the first time. Going forward, strengthening social protection is of utmost important to improve the well-being of the Malaysian people, including self-employed workers, and prepare for the ageing society. Easing government regulations further is crucial to stimulate business dynamism and restore vigorous growth. Accelerating digitalisation will be key for Malaysian firms to become more productive in the post-pandemic era. Along with its further economic development, Malaysia needs to transform itself into a greener economy. SPECIAL FEATURES: PRODUCT MARKET REGULATION; DIGITALISATION; TELEWORKING
  • 30-juillet-2021

    Français

    Hongrie : des réformes visant à accroître la productivité renforceraient la reprise consécutive à la crise liée au COVID-19, selon l’OCDE

    L’économie de la Hongrie est en train de sortir de la crise provoquée par la pandémie de COVID-19, mais pour retrouver durablement la croissance vigoureuse que connaissait le pays avant la crise, il faudra mettre en œuvre des réformes pour renforcer la productivité et la création d’emplois, selon un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE.

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  • 30-juillet-2021

    Français, Excel, 12,676kb

    Hongrie 2021 synthèse

    synthèse de l'Étude économique de la Hongrie 2021

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  • 30-July-2021

    English

    Value chains in public marine data - A UK case study

    Marine data play a crucial role for many scientific disciplines, as well as for very diverse operational services such as fisheries management, environmental planning, marine conservation, weather forecasting, or port management. The information derived from marine data is also increasingly finding its way into a wide and varied range of public policy arenas and private industries. Collecting, distributing and archiving public marine data provide benefits to society at large, however as with all public investments, assessments are needed to provide evidence to decision makers. Based on an original survey of UK marine data users, this paper explores pathways through which marine data are used and transformed into actionable information, creating systematised value chains for the first time. The analysis unveils trends in current marine data uses in the UK and key benefits of data uses. The paper lays the foundations for further OECD work with the marine data community.
  • 29-July-2021

    English

    Corporate effective tax rates for R&D - The case of expenditure-based R&D tax incentives

    R&D tax incentives have become a widely used policy tool to promote business R&D. How do they shape firms’ incentives to invest in R&D? This paper contributes a methodology to construct forward-looking effective tax rates for an R&D investment that reflect the value of expenditure-based R&D tax incentives. The new OECD estimates cover 48 countries and consider the case of large profitable firms, accounting for the bulk of R&D in most economies. The results provide new insights into the generosity of R&D tax incentives from the perspective of firms that decide on whether or where to invest in R&D (extensive margin) and the level (intensive margin) of R&D investment. The generosity of the favourable tax treatment of R&D is shown to vary at the intensive and extensive margins, highlighting differences in countries’ strategies to support R&D through the tax system.
  • 29-July-2021

    English

    Making life richer, easier and healthier - Robots, their future and the roles for public policy

    This paper addresses the current and emerging uses and impacts of robots, the mid-term future of robotics and the role of policy. Progress in robotics will help to make life easier, richer and healthier. Wider robot use will help raise labour productivity. As science and engineering progress, robots will become more central to crisis response, from helping combat infectious diseases to maintaining critical infrastructure. Governments can accelerate and orient the development and uptake of socially valuable robots, for instance by: supporting cross-disciplinary R&D, facilitating research commercialisation, helping small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) understand the opportunities for investment in robots, supporting platforms that highlight robot solutions in healthcare and other sectors, embedding robotics engineering in high school curricula, tailoring training for workers with vocational-level mechanical skills, supporting data development useful to robotics, ensuring flexible regulation conducive to innovation, strengthening digital connectivity, and raising awareness of the importance of robotics.
  • 23-July-2021

    English, Excel, 150kb

    Indicators and database Governance 2018

    Indicators and database Governance 2018

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  • 22-July-2021

    English, PDF, 592kb

    Economics Department Working Papers by cross country analysis

    This series of Working Papers is designed to make available, to a wider readership, selected studies which the Department has prepared for use within OECD. Authorship is generally collective, but main individual authors are named.

  • 22-July-2021

    English, PDF, 1,069kb

    Economics Department Working Papers - List

    This series of Working Papers is designed to make available, to a wider readership, selected studies which the Department has prepared for use within OECD. Authorship is generally collective, but main individual authors are named.

  • 22-July-2021

    English

    COVID-19, Productivity and Reallocation: Timely evidence from three OECD countries

    The longer run consequences of the pandemic will partly hinge on its impact on high productivity firms, and the ongoing process of labour reallocation from low to high productivity firms. While Schumpeter (1939) proposed that recessions can accelerate this process, the nature of the COVID-19 shock coupled with a policy response that prioritised preservation (over reallocation) raises questions about whether job reallocation remained productivity-enhancing. Using novel, near-real-time data for Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, this paper shows that while labour turnover fell in response to the pandemic, job reallocation remained connected to firm productivity – that is, high productivity firms were more likely to expand and low productivity firms were more likely to contract. The pandemic coincided with a temporary strengthening of the reallocation-productivity link in Australia – but a weakening in New Zealand – which appears related to the design of job retention schemes. Finally, firms that intensively used Apps to manage their business were more resilient, even after controlling for productivity. Thus, while policy partly suppressed creative destruction, the nature of the shock – i.e. one where being online and able to operate remotely were key – favoured high productivity and tech-savvy firms, resulting in a reallocation of labour to such firms. The use of timely, novel data to investigate the allocative effects of the pandemic marks a significant advance, given that the seminal paper on productivity-enhancing reallocation during the Great Recession arrived some six years after Lehman Brothers collapsed.
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