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Prestations et questions sociales


  • 21-December-2021

    English

    Is the German Middle Class Crumbling? Risks and Opportunities

    Thriving middle classes are the backbone of democratic societies and strong economies, but in many countries, they face mounting pressure as their economic strength is eroding relative to higher-income households. Real wages and incomes for most middle-class households have grown only very slowly, and rising expenditures have been putting further pressure on living standards. Meanwhile, globalisation, digitalisation, and demographic change are eroding job opportunities for middle-skilled workers, who risk sliding into lower-paid employment. The COVID-19 crisis has accentuated socio-economic divides and may end up accelerating some of the above trends. This publication builds upon the OECD’s publications on the middle class (Under Pressure: The Squeezed Middle Class) and social mobility (A Broken Social Elevator? How to Promote Social Mobility). It demonstrates that the German middle class is similar in size as in peer countries, but substantially smaller than it was in the mid-1990s. Lower middle‑class households face an increased risk of slipping out of the middle; meanwhile, upward mobility into the middle has declined, particularly for workers in 'typical' middle-class occupations. Employment growth forecasts point to further occupational polarisation. The review proposes policy options for strengthening the employability of middle-class workers, creating good-quality, future-oriented jobs, and boosting middle‑class disposable incomes.
  • 22-December-2020

    English

    How reliable are social safety nets? - Value and accessibility in situations of acute economic need

    Social protection systems use a range of entitlement criteria. First-tier support typically requires contributions or past employment in many countries, while safety net benefits are granted on the basis of need. In a context of volatile and uncertain labour markets, careful and continuous monitoring of the effectiveness of income support is a key input into an evidence-based policy process. This paper proposes a novel empirical method for monitoring the accessibility and levels of safety net benefits. It focusses on minimum-income benefits (MIB) and other non-contributory transfers and relies on data on the amounts of cash support that individuals in need receive in practice. Results show that accessibility and benefit levels differ enormously across countries – for instance, in 2015/16, more than four out of five low-income workless one-person households received MIB in Australia, France and the United Kingdom, compared to only one in five in Greece, Italy and Korea, three countries that have since sought to strengthen aspects of safety-net provisions.
  • 10-April-2019

    English, PDF, 367kb

    The Squeezed Middle Class - How does Germany compare?

    This country fact-sheet presents key figures from "Under Pressure: The Squeezed Middle Class". This report analyses the trends of middle-income households in areas such as employment, consumption, wealth and debt, as well as perceptions and social attitudes. It also includes recommendations for protecting middle-class living standards and financial security in the face of economic challenges.

  • 27-March-2019

    English, PDF, 794kb

    Society at a Glance 2019 - How does Germany compare?

    This country highlight puts the spotlight on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people: their numbers, their economic situation and well-being and policies to improve LGBT inclusivity. It also includes a special chapter on people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and presents a selection of social indicators.

  • 18-May-2017

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Bad Neuenahr, 18-19 May 2017

    The Secretary-General was in Bad Neuenahr, Germany, on 18-19 May 2017 to attend the G20 Labour and Employment Ministers Meeting entitled "Towards and Inclusive Future - Shaping the World of Work". He delivered remarks at Thematic Sessions “Future of Work”, “Promoting fair and effective labour market integration of regular migrants and recognised refugees" ” and “Fostering decent work for sustainable global supply chain”.

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  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Towards a Better Globalisation - How Germany Can Respond to the Crisis

    People in many countries, especially advanced countries, are expressing growing discontent about globalisation. They feel that its benefits have accrued mostly to a small and already well-off segment of the population. In addition, many citizens are dissatisfied with the way economic integration has been advanced. They complain about too little transparency and too many conflicts of interests between policy makers and firms. Several of the negative effects feeding the discontent have more to do with technological change than with globalisation per se, but the two are closely intertwined. Moreover, the policies put in place to alleviate negative impacts of economic openness on some groups, industries and regions have not always worked as intended, and global rule-making has not kept up with reality. Given its many benefits, reversing economic integration is not a solution. Rather, we need to find ways to make it work for all. This report sets out what needs to be done to advance a fairer and more inclusive globalisation – at the global level, at the European level and within Germany.
  • 20-February-2017

    English

    Dare to Share: Germany's Experience Promoting Equal Partnership in Families

    This review introduces the background to and issues at stake in promoting equal partnerships in families in Germany.  It encourages German policy makers to build on the important reforms since the mid-2000s to enable both fathers and mothers to have careers and children, and urges families to 'dare to share'. To those ends it places Germany’s experience in an international comparison, and draws from the experience in, for example, France and the Nordic countries which have longstanding policies to support work-life balance and strengthen gender equality. The review starts with an overview chapter also explaining why and how equal sharing pays for families, children, the economy and society as a whole. The book presents current outcomes, policy trends, as well as detailed analysis of the drivers of paid and unpaid work and how more equal partnerships in families may help sustain fertility rates.  The book examines policies to promote partnership, looking both at persistent shortcomings and progress achieved through reform since the mid-2000s. The book includes a set of policy recommendations designed to enable parents to share work and family responsibilities more equally.
  • 16-September-2015

    English

    Promoting gender equality in the G7 and beyond: education, employment and entrepreneurship

    2015 is the year in which we aim to develop a new architecture for financing development for the Sustainable Development Goals and to build, during COP 21 in Paris, a new framework to tackle climate change. In all these arenas, decisive action for women’s rights and enhanced gender equality can play a crucial role.

  • 5-novembre-2013

    Français

    Évaluer le coût humain de la crise : l'OCDE souligne combien il importe d’investir dans le bien-être

    Selon une nouvelle étude publiée par l'OCDE, la crise économique mondiale a eu d’importantes répercussions sur le bien-être des populations, qui s’étendent bien au-delà des suppressions d’emplois et de la perte de revenus puisqu’elles influent sur la satisfaction des individus à l’égard de leur vie et sur leur confiance dans les pouvoirs publics.

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  • 17-December-2012

    German, PDF, 432kb

    Closing the Gender Gap - country note: Germany

    Gains in female education attainment have contributed to a worldwide increase in women’s participation in the labour force, but considerable gaps remain in working hours, conditions of employment and earnings.  More specific data for Germany are available in this country note.

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