The OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation

Update No. 12 –  November  2009


Content

Hot off the press
Measuring innovation in education: which way forward?
21C skills
Market mechanisms
CERI Eye
Don't miss
Events
 

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Hot off the press

Working Out Change: Systemic Innovation in Vocational Education and Training

What can  education systems do to become more innovative? This book analyses systemic innovation in education by looking at the ways in which educational systems encourage innovation, the knowledge base and processes used, and the procedures and criteria used to assess progress and evaluate outcomes. It draws on findings from 14 case studies in Vocational Education and Training in six OECD countries: Australia, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Mexico and Switzerland. The resulting analysis helps us understand how we can support and sustain innovation in educational systems in the VET sector.

To find out more

Download a free pdf version of this book

Beyond Textbooks: Digital Learning Resources as Systemic Innovation in the Nordic Countries

Technology is a key driver of educational innovation, and a variety of programmes focusing on investment in infrastructure, equipment, in-service training and digital learning resources have been established to promote its usage in primary and secondary schools. So far, little comparative analytical attention has been devoted to understanding how digital resources improve the quality of learning and to assessing the public policies that support their development and use, and the role played by other stakeholders like publishers, broadcasting companies and increasingly user communities. This publication aims to fill that gap by both reviewing and evaluating the process of systemic innovation. Drawing on case studies from five Nordic countries, the report assembles information on the knowledge bases and policy actors which impact each phase of this innovation process and the main factors which influence its success including governance, financing and user involvement.

To find out more

Download a free pdf version of this book

Higher Education to 2030, Volume 2, Globalisation

This is the second volume in the Higher Education to 2030 series, which takes a forward-looking approach to analysing the impact of various contemporary trends on tertiary education systems. Volume 1 examines the effects of demography, while volume 3 explores the effects of technology. This volume examines what challenges and opportunities globalisation is bringing to higher education, and as a consequence, how education might look in the future. The fourth and final volume will present scenarios illustrating the main trends and driving forces for the future of higher education.

To find out more

Download a free pdf version of this book

Measuring innovation in education: which way forward?
Policies supporting innovation and improvement in education need reliable data. There has been a long-standing effort to develop innovation indicators for the private sector that help monitor the progress of innovation and evaluate the success of associated policies. But measuring innovation and its effectiveness in the public sector, and in education in particular, is in its infancy. Despite the relative wealth of indicators in education, we still lack data that measure the innovation capacity and performance of education systems as well as link improvement to innovations in classroom and school practices. Defining and measuring innovation in education and other public services is not straight-forward. Nevertheless, there are currently a number of ongoing initiatives both within the OECD Secretariat and at national level paving the way for the development of such indicators.
CERI convened a workshop in Paris on 11 June 2009 to discuss these initiatives and start a discussion on possible avenues for the international measurement of innovation in education.

To find out more

Consult the website for the Innovation Strategy


21C skills
Today’s labour force has to be equipped with the set of skills and competencies which are suited to the knowledge economies. Most of them are related to knowledge management, which includes processes related to information selection, acquisition, integration, analysis and sharing in socially networked environments. Not surprisingly, most of these competencies, if not all, are either supported or enhanced by ICT. For young people, schools are the only place where such competencies and skills can be educated.
Accordingly, governments should make an effort to properly identify and conceptualise the set of skills and competencies required as to incorporate them into the educational standards that every student should be able reach by the end of compulsory schooling. Governments should realise that to be successful in this process there are two requirements to be met. On the one hand, participation of both economic and social institutions, ranging from companies to higher education institutions, is critical. On the other hand, all this process risks of being irrelevant for schools unless this set of skills and competencies becomes the very core of what teachers and schools should care about, and this can only be done by incorporating them into the national education standards that are enforced and assessed by governments.
The first International Conference on the New Millennium Learners on the theme of 21st Century Skills took place in Brussels (September 21-23).   

To find out more

Consult the website for the New Millenium Learners


Market mechanisms
A key question facing policy makers in OECD countries is: how to govern education systems to ensure they deliver the best possible educational outcomes? Almost all OECD governments have sought to introduce one or more market mechanisms as part of the answer to this question. Proponents claim that relying more on market mechanisms results in higher quality, more efficiency and more demand sensitivity; while opponents stress the danger of schools with increasingly unequal quality, unequal access to high quality schools and segregation.
Given the widespread and growing importance of market mechanisms in education, a new CERI project is focussing on the role of market mechanisms in the governance of education which aims to: improve our understanding of what we mean by market mechanisms in education; contribute to the empirical knowledge base by collecting data on market mechanisms; and explore what viable governance systems are able to deal with the new reality of de-centralisation, choice and competition which limit the traditional steering options for governments.
The project will deliver in 2010 a series of OECD working papers and a policy brief as well as organising a series of seminars and a dissemination conference in.

To find out more

Consult the website for Markets in Education


CERI Eye
CERI Analysts are invited all over the globe to participate in conferences and present their work. This section on the CERI website highlights reports back from some of these missions, most recent postings.

Don't Miss

educationtoday

OECD's educationlighthousefor the way out of the crisis

Join this new information sharing platform on the impact of the crisis on education.

To register

www.oecd.org/edu/lighthouse




Events

February 2010

22-24

International Conference on 1-to-1 Computing in Education

Vienna, Austria

25-26

Conference on Education, Social Capital and Health

Oslo, Norway

 


OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)

 2 Rue André Pascal - 75775 Paris Cedex 16 - France
+33 1 45 24 82 00 - ceri.contact@oecd.org - www.oecd.org/edu/ceri