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  • 15-November-2019

    English

    Skills Matter - Additional Results from the Survey of Adult Skills

    In the wake of the technological revolution that began in the last decades of the 20th century, labour-market demand for information-processing and other high-level cognitive and interpersonal skills have been growing substantially. Based on the results from the 33 countries and regions that participated in the 1st and 2nd round of the Survey of Adult Skills in 2011-12 and in 2014-15, this report describes adults’ proficiency in three information-processing skills, and examines how proficiency is related to labour-market and social outcomes. It also places special emphasis on the results from the 3rd and final round of the first cycle of PIAAC in 2017-18, which included 6 countries (Ecuador, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Peru and the United States). The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to provide insights into the availability of some of these key skills in society and how they are used at work and at home. The first survey of its kind, it directly measures proficiency in three information-processing skills: literacy, numeracy and problem-solving in technology-rich environments.
  • 15-November-2019

    English

    The Survey of Adult Skills - Reader’s Companion, Third Edition

    This edition of the Reader’s Companion accompanies Skills Matter: Additional Results from the Survey of Adult Skills that reports the results from the 39 countries and regions that participated in the 3 rounds of data collection in the first cycle of PIAAC, with a particular focus on the 6 countries that participated in the third round of the study (Ecuador, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Mexico, Peru and the United States). It describes the design and methodology of the survey and its relationship to other international assessments of young students and adults. The Survey of Adult Skills, a product of the OECD Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), was designed to provide insights into the availability of some key skills in society and how they are used at work and at home. The first survey of its kind, it directly measures proficiency in several information-processing skills – namely literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments.
  • 19-June-2019

    English, PDF, 419kb

    TALIS 2018 Country Note - Korea

    The OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) is an international, large-scale survey of teachers, school leaders and the learning environment in schools. This note presents findings based on the reports of lower secondary teachers and their school leaders in mainstream public and private schools.

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  • 5-December-2017

    English

    OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Korea 2015

    Skills are central to Korea’s future prosperity and the well-being of its people. The OECD Skills Strategy Diagnostic Report: Korea identifies 12 skills challenges that need to be addressed to build a more effective skills system in Korea. These challenges were identified through: 1) the OECD’s recent data and research; 2) the national data and research; 3) a diagnostic workshop 4) fact-finding interviews with key stakeholders in Korea. The report has also benefited from ongoing dialogue and consultation with a wide range of Korean stakeholders. The first nine challenges refer to specific outcomes across the three pillars of developing, activating and using skills. The next three challenges refer to the 'enabling' conditions that strengthen the overall skills system. Success in tackling these skills challenges will boost performance across the whole skills system. All of the challenges identified are strongly interlinked, and their connections with each other are identified throughout the report. Failure to look beyond policy silos will have implications for specific groups in Korea, such as youth, as well as for the economy and society’s ability to recover following the economic crisis and build a solid foundation for future prosperity.
  • 11-October-2016

    English

    Labour market reforms in Korea to promote inclusive growth

    Labour market reforms are essential to promote social cohesion by removing obstacles to employment, particularly for women, youth and older persons.

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  • 15-October-2014

    English

    Korea: Promote inclusive growth through greater employer involvement in the employment and skills system, says OECD

    Korea has made significant progress towards decentralising the management of employment and training programmes, but can still do more to create stronger links with employers at the local level, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 18-September-2014

    English

    Reducing the high rate of poverty among the elderly in Korea

    One-half of Korea's population aged 65 and over lives in relative poverty, nearly four times higher than the OECD average of 13%. Elderly poverty is thus an urgent social problem.

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  • 9-September-2014

    English, PDF, 574kb

    Education at a Glance 2014: Korea

    Korea has a huge educational gap between the younger and older generations.

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  • 29-July-2014

    English

    Reducing income inequality and poverty and promoting social mobility in Korea

    To strengthen social cohesion, a top government priority, it is essential to address the labour market roots of inequality by breaking down dualism to reduce the share of non-regular workers and to boost the employment ratio toward the government’s 70% target.

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  • 14-March-2014

    English

    Strong Performers and Successful Reformers in Education - Lessons from PISA for Korea

    The story of Korean education over the past 50 years is one of remarkable growth and achievement. Korea is one of the top performing countries in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) survey and among those with the highest proportion of young people who have completed upper secondary and tertiary education.

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