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Colombia


  • 21-April-2016

    English

    Colombia’s moment of truth (OECD Education&Skills Today Blog)

    Over the past 15 years, Colombia’s education system has undergone an extraordinary transformation.

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  • 4-December-2015

    English, PDF, 297kb

    Students, Computers and Learning: Making the Connection - Colombia

    Despite rapidly expanding access to ICT among households, in 2012 some 37% of 15-year-old students in Colombia still had no access to a computer at home (in 2009, this proportion was 52%).

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  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Reforming the pension system to increase coverage and equity in Colombia

    Colombia is one of the most unequal countries in Latin America. The high level of informality in the labour market and many characteristics of the pension system leave many elderly in poverty. Only formal-sector employees earning more than the relatively high minimum wage are covered.

  • 6-November-2014

    English, PDF, 638kb

    Education at a Glance 2014: Colombia

    In Colombia, 42% of 25-64 year-old attained at least upper secondary education, a much smaller proportion than the OECD average of 75%. Only China, Indonesia, Mexico, Portugal and Turkey have smaller proportions (varying from 22% in China to 38% in Portugal).

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  • 5-November-2014

    Spanish, PDF, 733kb

    Education at a Glance 2014: Colombia (Spanish)

    En Colombia, el 42% de la población de 25 a 64 años tiene como mínimo educación media superior; una proporción mucho menor que el promedio de la OCDE de 75%. Sólo China, Indonesia, México, Portugal y Turquía tienen porcentajes más bajos (que van del 22% en China al 38% en Portugal.

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  • 3-April-2013

    English

    Income inequality and poverty in Colombia. Part 2. The redistributive impact of taxes and transfers

    Income inequality in Colombia has declined since the early 2000s but remains very high by international standards. While most of the inequality originates from the labour market, wealth – and thus capital income – is also highly concentrated and the tax and transfer system has little redistributive impact.

  • 3-April-2013

    English

    Income inequality and poverty in Colombia. Part 1. The role of the labour market

    Income inequality in Colombia has declined since the early 2000s but remains very high by international standards. Income dispersion largely originates from the labour market, which is characterised by a still high unemployment rate, a pervasive informal sector and a wide wage dispersion reflecting a large education premium for those with higher education.

  • 24-January-2013

    Spanish, PDF, 2,292kb

    Evaluaciones de políticas nacionales de Educación - La Educación superior en Colombia

    Colombia es una de las principales economías de la región de América Latina y el Caribe y el gobierno tiene planes ambiciosos para su desarrollo social y económico, para lo que es crucial el fortalecimiento del capital humano.

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  • 24-January-2013

    English, PDF, 2,152kb

    Reviews of National Policies for Education: Tertiary Education in Colombia 2012

    In Colombia, the beginning of a new century has brought with it a palpable feeling of optimism. Colombians and visitors sense that the country’s considerable potential can be realised, and education is rightly seen as crucial to this process. As opportunities expand, Colombians will need new and better skills to respond to new challenges and prospects.

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  • 29-October-2012

    English

    Reviews of National Policies for Education: Tertiary Education in Colombia 2012

    In Colombia, the beginning of a new century has brought with it a palpable feeling of optimism. Colombians and visitors sense that the country’s considerable potential can be realised, and education is rightly seen as crucial to this process. As opportunities expand, Colombians will need new and better skills to respond to new challenges and prospects.

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