United States


  • 29-May-2015

    English

    Middle-class economics

    In 2014, the US economy added more jobs than in any year since the 1990s. In fact, this longest streak of job growth on record has persisted into 2015. Inflation-adjusted wages are up by 1.4% annually over the last two years, more than twice the pace of the last recovery. But this is still not enough to make up for decades of subpar gains for middle-class families–a challenge shared by many other OECD economies.

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  • 17-April-2015

    English

    Addressing Growing Inequality through Inclusive Growth: Insights for the US and Beyond

    In his speech delivered at the Brookings Institute, OECD Secretary-General Gurría explains that OECD’s numbers tell a clear-cut story of how our traditional economic growth agenda has neglected inclusiveness. Yet to begin to tackle this problem, we have to understand that inequality is not just about money. It touches every area of people’s lives.

  • 18-March-2015

    English

    Low oil prices and monetary easing triggering modest acceleration of global recovery

    Low oil prices and monetary easing are boosting growth in the world’s major economies, but the near-term pace of expansion remains modest, withabnormally low inflation and interest rates pointing to risks of financial instability, according to the OECD’s latest Interim Economic Assessment.

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  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 97kb

    Going for growth 2015 - United States

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for the United States identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 4-September-2014

    English

    OECD appoints Catherine L. Mann as new Chief Economist

    OECD Secretary-General, Angel Gurría is pleased to announce the appointment of Ms. Catherine L. Mann as the new OECD Chief Economist. Her appointment will reinforce the OECD’s commitment to identifying and promoting better policies for better lives around the world.

  • 28-August-2014

    English

    An exploration of the determinants of the subjective well-being of Americans during the Great Recession

    This paper uses data from the American Life Panel to understand the determinants of well-being in the United States during the Great Recession. It investigates how various dimensions of subjective well-being reflected in the OECD Better Life Framework impact subjective well-being.

  • 29-July-2014

    English

    US long term interest rates and capital flows to emerging economies

    This paper studies the association between US long term interest rates and cycles of capital flows to emerging market economies (EMEs). It finds that, indeed, cycles in capital flows to EMEs are linked to global conditions, including global risk aversion and long term interest rates in the United States.

  • 24-July-2014

    English

    Making the best of new energy resources in the United States

    Since around 2007, the country has been enjoying an “energy renaissance” thanks to its abundant stocks of shale oil and gas. The resurgence in oil and gas production is beginning to create discernible economic impacts and has changed the landscape for natural gas prices in the United States, boosting competitiveness.

  • 24-July-2014

    English

    Improving well-being in the United States

    Life is quite good in the United States compared to other OECD countries, thanks to strong economic growth and technological progress having lifted average income to high levels. Nonetheless, there is evidence that the benefits from growth have not been sufficiently broad based.

  • 24-July-2014

    English

    Workplace stress in the United States: issues and policies

    Despite relative affluence, workplace stress is a prominent feature of the US labour market. To the extent that job stress causes poor health outcomes – either directly through increased blood ressure, fatigue, muscle pain, etc. or indirectly through increased rates of cigarette smoking – policy to lessen job stress may be appropriate.

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