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  • 21-October-2020

    English

    Lessons learnt from the 2019 Total Official Support for Sustainable Development (TOSSD) data survey

    Total official support for sustainable development (TOSSD) is a new international statistical measure that provides a complete picture of all official resources and private finance mobilised by official interventions in support of sustainable development and the SDGs. It consists of two pillars: cross-border resources to developing countries (pillar I) and support to international public goods and global challenges (pillar II). To test the TOSSD concept and operationalise the reporting, a data survey was carried out in 2019 on 2017 resources. This paper analyses the main lessons learnt from the survey with the objective to help further refine the TOSSD Reporting Instructions and data collection process, and provide evidence to the international community about the usefulness, relevance and feasibility of TOSSD as a measurement framework for the SDG era. TOSSD can respond to developing countries’ needs for information on external financing for sustainable development (pillar I), with estimates showing that between 18% and 26% of the volume of resources captured in the survey relate to additional data captured in TOSSD. TOSSD can fill a key information gap on financing for international public goods (IPGs) that support the achievement SDGs (pillar II). The TOSSD framework is appropriate for various providers of financing for sustainable development, including traditional providers, South-South Co-operation providers and multilateral institutions. To enhance the usefulness and relevance of TOSSD, efforts will need to continue to fill the remaining data gaps and enhance data quality.
  • 21-October-2020

    English

    Solomon Islands transition finance country diagnostic - Preparing for graduation from Least Developed Country (LDC) status

    This working paper aims to better understand the process of graduation from least developed country (LDC) states in a Pacific small island developing state (SIDS), and provides the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and other development partners with evidence-based analysis and recommendations on how to better manage transition in such context. Solomon Islands is engaged in a multifaceted transition stage with financial, technical, geopolitical and environmental dimensions. Solomon Islands is scheduled to graduate from the category of LDC by 2024, and the global alliance for vaccines and immunisations (GAVI) financial support by 2022. The transition finance approach used in this study shows that Development Assistance Committee (DAC) members have a crucial role to play to support the country’s transition and should utilise their official development assistance (ODA) in a way that maximises its impact. This would entail: helping the country move towards a sustainable economic model (both in terms of environmental and financial/debt sustainability), supporting the progressive substitution of ODA by other financing sources (in particular domestic resources and private investment), and adapting their role and strategy to the country’s evolving circumstances and needs (for example by establishing new economic partnerships in support of the country’s strategy of economic diversification and promotion of higher value-added trade and private investment).
  • 16-October-2020

    English

    2020 IMF and World Bank Annual Meetings : Written Statement to the Development Committee

    2020 IMF and World Bank Annual Meetings : Written Statement to the Development Committee

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  • 15-October-2020

    English

    Sustainable Reintegration of Returning Migrants - A Better Homecoming

    For many OECD countries, how to ensure the safe and dignified return to their origin countries of migrants who do not have grounds to remain is a key question. Alongside removal, return and reintegration assistance have become an integral part of the response. Development cooperation is expanding its activity to support the capacity of countries of origin to reintegrate all returning migrants. Sustainable Reintegration of Returning Migrants: A Better Homecoming reports the results of a multi-country peer review project carried out by the OECD, with support from the German Corporation for International Cooperation (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). It examines factors that can help improve the sustainability of reintegration at the individual level and at the programme level in countries of destination and origin. The report examines how casework and community-based programmes can increase uptake and improve outcomes. It identifies key elements of an effective individual reintegration programme, including outreach and counselling, case management and referral, and partnerships. The report makes proposals about how to improve programme design, evaluation, and monitoring, indicating areas where countries could co-operate more in implementation of programmes and in coordination with origin countries.
  • 12-October-2020

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Japan 2020

    The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts reviews of the individual development co‑operation efforts of DAC members once every five to six years. DAC peer reviews critically examine the overall performance of a given member, not just that of its development co‑operation agency, covering its policy, programmes and systems. They take an integrated, system‑wide perspective on the development co‑operation activities of the member under review and its approach to fragility, crisis and humanitarian assistance. Japan combines diplomatic, peace and development efforts to achieve sustainable development and implements the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through a whole-of-society approach. It values self-reliant development, country ownership and the mutual benefits of development co-operation for Japan and its partner countries. Japan is recognised as a global champion of disaster risk reduction. Increasing official development assistance could strengthen Japan's leadership and commitment to the SDGs and a mechanism would help ensure coherence between domestic policies and global sustainable development objectives. Whole-of-government country policies would ensure synergies across Japan's portfolio and it could be more explicit about how programmes reduce poverty. More streamlined systems and procedures would make Japan a more agile donor.
  • 9-October-2020

    English

    Peacebuilding in fragile contexts

    Peacebuilding thinking and practice have evolved significantly over the past decade. The business case for the effectiveness of peacebuilding has been established. Successful interventions underscore the importance of peacebuilding initiatives, as do the high-profile failures that occur when peacebuilding is absent, fragmented or insufficient. With the emergence of new approaches to peacebuilding led by the United Nations Peacebuilding Architecture Review, this paper examines the state of peacebuilding operations and finance in fragile contexts and, building on established trends and debates, identifies four areas that could be critical for driving progress on peacebuilding over the next decade. The paper is one of ten working papers supporting States of Fragility 2020. Together with the papers entitled 'Diplomacy and peace in fragile contexts', 'Conflict prevention in fragile contexts', and 'Security actors in fragile contexts', It provides a comprehensive background to Chapter 2 on peace in States of Fragility 2020.
  • 6-October-2020

    English

    Green Infrastructure in the Decade for Delivery - Assessing Institutional Investment

    Building green is not only imperative to achieve global climate and development commitments in this 'decade for delivery', but will also be critical to sustain socio-economic development during the COVID-19 recovery. Private investment in particular is needed to bridge the infrastructure investment gap, given institutional investors’ large pools of long-term capital. After several years of efforts to upscale institutional investment in infrastructure, where does the level of investment stand today? This report provides a first-of-its-kind empirical assessment of investment in infrastructure by institutional investors domiciled in OECD and G20 countries, presenting a snapshot from February 2020. Based on a new detailed view of investment channels, financial instruments, sectoral allocations, regional preferences and trends, the report provides guidance on policy levers and priorities to scale-up institutional investment in green infrastructure.
  • 5-October-2020

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Greece 2020

    Greece has undergone extensive reforms to cope with a deep recession over the past decade. It has made progress in decoupling air pollutant emissions from GDP and improving the conservation status of natural habitats. However, the country faces challenges in managing waste and water, and addressing air pollution. It is highly vulnerable to the impact of climate change. The energy mix has shifted towards cleaner fuels, but the economy strongly relies on fossil fuels. Progress towards sustainable development requires effective implementation of ambitious climate mitigation and adaptation policies, strengthening environmental governance and enhancing coherence between environmental and energy, transport, agriculture and tourism policies. This is the third Environmental Performance Review of Greece. It evaluates progress towards sustainable development and green growth, with special features on climate change mitigation and adaptation, and biodiversity conservation and sustainable use.
  • 5-October-2020

    English

    Rural Well-being - Geography of Opportunities

    Rural Well-being: Geography of Opportunities presents the latest iteration on this policy framework, reflecting several important changes in rural development in recent years. Fully taking into account the variety of situations characterising rural regions, the new policy framework leverages improved data and analysis while broadening the scope from economic focus to encompass the environmental and social dimensions of well-being. The new approach places the well-being of citizens at the forefront of its objective and recognises the diversity of rural places brought by a deeper understanding of their diverse and complex socio-economic systems and their connection to cities. The framework also looks to the future and unfolding megatrends such as globalisation, digitalisation, climate change and demographic change. It reflects on how these will impact rural economies and reviews policy options to mitigate the challenges and capitalise on opportunities as well as to develop resilience against emerging crises. Finally, recognising the strong interdependencies between different stakeholders and the need for partnerships between government, the private sector and civil society to successfully implement policies, the Rural Well-being Policy Framework focuses on governance mechanisms, including the OECD Principles on Rural Policy.
  • 28-September-2020

    English

    Tax Inspectors Without Borders: supporting developing countries to increase tax revenues despite COVID-19 challenges

    The international community continues to make progress towards strengthening developing countries' ability to effectively tax multinational enterprises, despite the adverse impact of the COVID-19 crisis on domestic resource mobilisation efforts.

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