By Date


  • 16-January-2017

    English

    Cross-border Co-operation and Policy Networks in West Africa

    This publication examines how policy actors involved in cross-border co-operation contribute to the regional integration process in West Africa. It uses a pioneering methodology, known as social network analysis, to visualise the formal and informal relationships between actors involved in cross-border policy networks, showing that borders have notable and diverse impacts on exchanges of information and the relative power of networks. The report then analyses a range of regional indicators of co-operation potential, visually demonstrating that borders can also affect the ability of sub-regions within West Africa to develop cross-border initiatives in a number of ways. Combining these two analyses with the perceptions of regional policy makers as to which sub-regions they consider as priorities for cross-border co-operation, the publication concludes with the identification of areas that are most pertinent for regional integration. The report thus provides the analytical foundations for local and regional actors to develop more effective, tailored initiatives that can enhance cross-border co-operation in West Africa.

  • 19-December-2016

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: United States 2016

    The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the performance of a given member, not just that of its development co-operation agency, and examine both policy and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide perspective on the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities of the member under review.

  • 7-December-2016

    English, PDF, 1,186kb

    Aid for trade and the sustainable development aganda: strengthening synergies

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with the Sustainable Development Goals at its core calls to “(…) increase aid-for-trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries.” In response, the OECD Action Plan on the Sustainable Development Goals: Better Policies for 2030 also argues for further promoting aid for trade and ensuring that it supports the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

    Related Documents
  • 7-December-2016

    English

    Biodiversity Offsets - Effective Design and Implementation

    This report examines the key design and implementation features that need to be considered to ensure that biodiversity offset programmes are environmentally effective, economically efficient, and distributionally equitable. Biodiversity offsets are being increasingly used in a wide range of sectors as a mechanism to help compensate for the adverse effects caused by development projects in a variety of ecosystems. In this report, insights and lessons learned are drawn from more that 40 case studies from around the world, with an additional 3 in-depth country case studies from the United States, Germany and Mexico.

  • 2-December-2016

    English

    Results-based decision making

    The OECD Development Co-operation Directorate is taking a fresh look at the results agenda in an effort to help advance results management among DAC members.

    Related Documents
  • 1-December-2016

    English

    Second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation - closing remarks

    While the SDG Summit was the “what” conference, the last two days have been the “how” conference. By 2030, we need to end extreme poverty. We need to have made a dent on all poverty. And we should be well on the way to eradicating it altogether.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Using aid for structural change in fragile states could help curb rising instability

    The world has grown more violent over the last decade, interrupting a long-term trend of increasing peace and disproportionately impacting civilians. This is despite rising financial flows to the most vulnerable places, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Moving forward: How effective development can deliver the 2030 Agenda - remarks at Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation 2nd high-level meeting

    As I mentioned at the opening of our conference, we need to go from billions to trillions when it comes to development finance. The Global Partnership provides a strong platform for bringing together the wide range of actors to make that happen.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    States of Fragility 2016 - Understanding Violence

    The world is getting more violent, and violence is occurring in surprising places. Over the past 15 years, 3.34 billion people, or almost half of the world’s population, have been affected by violence. The number of violent conflicts is decreasing, but conflicts are killing more people: conflict-related deaths have tripled since 2003. Violent extremism and terrorism are also on the rise. The economic cost of violence is rising too: the global economic impact of violence is a staggering USD 13.6 trillion, equivalent to 13.6% of Global GDP. And civilians, especially children and women, are most at risk.

    States of Fragility 2016: Understanding Violence takes a long hard look at violence in the world – and what we should do about it. The report showcases emerging thinking about violence, presents a new risk-based approach to monitoring various dimensions of fragility, and looks at financial flows in support of fragile contexts. Understanding Violence finds that development, peace and security efforts in the developing world have not kept pace with the new reality of violence. We need to dedicate more resources and attention to violence. And to be effective, we need to put people – especially youth – at the centre of our efforts.

  • 30-November-2016

    English

    Second High-Level Meeting of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation - opening remarks

    The urgency of sustainable development is evident in all countries. Shifts in wealth, power and growth challenge traditional development models. At the same time, we see new players, new ideas and new sources of finance. Developing countries are increasingly using taxes and remittances to finance their own development. In Africa alone in absolute numbers, tax revenues dwarf official development assistance by more than ten times.

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 > >>